peer review


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peer review

 
1. a basic component of a quality assurance program in which the results of health care given to a specific patient population are evaluated according to health-wellness outcome criteria established by peers of the professionals delivering the care. Peer review is focused on the patient and on the results of care given by a group of professionals rather than on individual professional practitioners. Review by peer groups is promoted by professional organizations as a means of maintaining standards of care. Retrospective review critically evaluates the results of work that has been completed; it is done for purposes of improving future practice. The source of data is medical records which document the full continuum of care provided and each patient's response to that care. Concurrent review takes place at the time the care is being given. It critically examines each patient's progress toward desired health-wellness outcomes. Sources of data for concurrent review are the patient's record and interview, observation, and inspection of the patient. A major advantage of concurrent review is that it provides the opportunity to improve care so that patients benefit from the review and recommended changes in ongoing care.
2. in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the systematic evaluation of a peer's performance compared with professional standards of practice.
3. Evaluation of a manuscript or research proposal by professional colleagues.

peer re·view

(pēr rē-vyū'),
Process of evaluating research proposals, manuscripts submitted for publication, and abstracts submitted for presentation at a scientific meeting, whereby these are judged for technical and scientific merit by other scientists in the same field.

peer review

The objective evaluation of the quality of a physician's or a scientist's performance by colleagues Medtalk The evaluation of a practitioner's professional performance, including identification of opportunities for improving the quality, necessity, and appropriateness–suitability of care; peer review organizations–PROs in the US contract with the CMS, formerly HCFA. See Peer-reviewed journal, Peer review organization.

peer re·view

(pēr rĕ-vyū')
Assessment of research proposals, manuscripts submitted for publication, or a physician's clinical practice by other physicians or scientists in the same field.

peer re·view

(pēr rĕ-vyū')
Assessment of research proposals, manuscripts submitted for publication, or a physician's clinical practice by other physicians or scientists in the same field.
References in periodicals archive ?
Majority (60.9%,n=25%) of the journals had not mentioned the type(original article, review article, case report etc) of the manuscript they want to review nor did they asked the reviewers to classify the manuscript (P value 0.053).Open peer review was mentioned in 2(66.6%) proformas and single blind peer review in 1(33.3%) while majority (92.6%, n=38) of the journals did not mention peer review type in their proformas (P value 0.00001).
After publication the author is incentivised to get their work peer reviewed (for example, only work that is peer reviewed is then indexed in PubMed Central and Europe PubMed Central).
The AICPA is now matching audits filed with the Federal Clearing House to the peer review report of the firm.
Not surprisingly, several of the major players within the OA environment are also involved in open peer review. After first experimenting in this space, they quickly became advocates.
The RAB or Peer Review Board may prescribe corrective actions for individuals with a "pattern of poor performance." Reviewers can agree in writing with suggested corrective actions.
Peer editing is a very popular method for peer review because it is easy to manage and it takes the least amount of time to teach.
She said the federal Health Care Quality Improvement Act deals with due process protections for doctors who have to go before a peer review committee.
Nevertheless, double-blind peer review as well as peer review more broadly does have drawbacks.
Also, editorial peer review seemed to increase the quality of the published repor ts, but the authors of the systematic review did not find that 2 studies on this topic could not be fully generalized to all journals.
The essential point is that, in the main, the profession has been won over to CET and will be won over to Peer Review. I know that there is a distinction to be made between Peer Review and Peer Discussion--the roadshows are actually an example of the latter.
"The mistake, of course, is to have thought that peer review was any more than a crude means of discovering the acceptability-not the validity- of a new finding.
Over the past decade, there has been increasing evidence describing the scientific publication process, the peer review of research manuscripts submitted to scientific journals, the incremental nature of scientific progress, and the ethics underlying the peer reviewing of scientific manuscripts.