peer


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peer

(pēr) [ME.]
One who has an equal standing with another in age, class, or rank.

peer review

The evaluation of the quality of the work effort of an individual by his or her colleagues. It could involve evaluation of articles submitted for publication or the quality of medical care administered by an individual, group, or hospital.
References in periodicals archive ?
We sent an email to the chief editors of all journals for peer review proforma.We received 41 proformas (33 general and 8 specialty journals).The salient features of the proformas are summarized in Table-I.
Regionally, the market for peer to peer lending is gaining traction and expanding to various regions including Asia-Pacific, North America, Europe, South America and Middle East & Africa.
Therefore, peer to peer has also been acknowledged as a social lending or crowd lending.
Peer support services play such an important role in the recovery process, Helgaas Burgum said.
Andrew Preston, co-founder and chief executive of peer review service provider, Publons, recently acquired by Clarivate, reckons 2017 was the first year that he actually saw a marked shift towards transparent peer review.
NAPPP recognizes that the Programmatic Standards and Ethics satisfied the original intentions for their development and have been acknowledged as the very foundation of Peer Programs by others outside the field.
File sharing between numbers of peer nodes in network is a critical task due to various numbers of attacks such as collision attack.
In May 2015, the Department of Labor released a report that found a greater percentage of nonconforming ERISA audits than were found by peer reviewers.
It was very reassuring as I read literature, attended lectures and participated in workshops to find out that my experiences of peer review were not unique.
A peer becomes a seed, once it finishes downloading the entire file.
Peer assessment has been extensively researched over many years with many academic writers supporting its use from as early as the 1970s (Kane & Lawler, 1978).