peduncle

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peduncle

 [pe-dung´k'l]
1. a stemlike connecting part.
2. a collection of nerve fibers connecting between different regions in the central nervous system.
3. the stalk by which a nonsessile tumor is attached to normal tissue. adj., adj pedun´cular.
cerebellar p's three sets of paired bundles (superior, middle, and inferior) connecting the cerebellum to the midbrain, pons, and medulla oblongata, respectively.
cerebral peduncle the anterior half of the midbrain, divisible into a posterior part (tegmentum) and an anterior part (crus cerebri), which are separated by the substantia nigra.
inferior cerebellar peduncle a large bundle of nerve fibers serving to connect the medulla oblongata and spinal cord with the cerebellum (especially the archicerebellum and paleocerebellum); it courses along the lateral border of the fourth ventricle and turns dorsally into the cerebellum. Formerly called caudal cerebellar peduncle.
middle cerebellar peduncle a large bundle of projection fibers originating in the contralateral pontine nuclei and entering the cerebellum, conveying impulses from the cerebral cortex to the neocerebellum.
pineal peduncle habenula (def. 2).
superior cerebellar peduncle a large bundle of projection fibers arising chiefly in the dentate nucleus of each cerebellar hemisphere (neocerebellum) and ascending to decussate in the mesencephalon; its fibers end mostly in the red nucleus and thalamus. Spinocerebellar fibers to the paleocerebellum lie adjacent to each peduncle. Formerly called rostral cerebellar peduncle.
p's of thalamus the four two-way radiations of thalamocortical fibers that connect the dorsal thalamus with many parts of the cerebral cortex, which together form a major portion of the internal capsule and the corona radiata.

pe·dun·cle

(pe-dŭng'kĕl, pē'dŭng-kĕl),
1. neuroanatomy term loosely applied to a variety of stalklike connecting structures in the brain, composed either exclusively of white matter (for example, cerebellar peduncle) or of white and gray matter (for example, cerebral peduncle).
2. Synonym(s): pedicle (2)
[Mod. L. pedunculus, dim. of pes, foot]

peduncle

/pe·dun·cle/ (pĕ-dung´k'l) a stemlike connecting part, especially (a) a collection of nerve fibers coursing between different areas in the central nervous system, or (b) the stalk by which a nonsessile tumor is attached to normal tissue.pedun´cular
cerebellar peduncles  three sets of paired bundles of the hindbrain (superior, middle, and inferior), connecting the cerebellum to the midbrain, pons, and medulla oblongata, respectively.
cerebral peduncle  the anterior half of the midbrain, divisible into an anterior part (crus cerebri) and a posterior part (tegmentum), which are separated by the substantia nigra.
pineal peduncle  habenula (2).
peduncles of thalamus  thalamic radiations.

peduncle

(pĭ-dŭng′kəl, pē′dŭng′kəl)
n.
1. Botany The stalk of an inflorescence or a stalk bearing a solitary flower in a one-flowered inflorescence.
2. Zoology A stalklike structure in invertebrate animals, usually serving as an attachment for a larger part or structure.
3. Anatomy A stalklike bundle of nerve fibers connecting different parts of the brain.
4. Medicine The stalklike base to which a polyp or tumor is attached.

pe·dun′cu·lar (pĭ-dŭng′kyə-lər) adj.

peduncle

[pədung′kəl]
Etymology: L, pes, foot
a stemlike connecting part, such as the pineal peduncle or a peduncle graft. peduncular, pedunculate, adj.

peduncle

A stalk, often referring to a sessile GI polyp

pe·dun·cle

(pĕ-dŭngk'ĕl)
1. neuroanatomy Term loosely applied to various stalklike connecting structures in the brain, composed either exclusively of white matter (e.g., cerebellar peduncle) or of white and gray matter (e.g., cerebral peduncle).
2. Synonym(s): pedicle (2) .
[Mod. L. pedunculus, dim. of pes, foot]

peduncle

A stalk-like bundle of fibres, especially nerve fibres that connects different parts of the central nervous system.

peduncle

the stalk of an inflorescence or a flower.

peduncle

a stemlike connecting part, especially: (1) a collection of nerve fibers coursing between different regions in the central nervous system, or (2) the stalk by which a nonsessile tumor is attached to normal tissue.

cerebellar p's
three pairs of thick, white fiber trunks that arise from the midbrain, pons and medulla and pass into the cerebellum.
cerebral peduncle
the ventral half of the midbrain, divisible into a dorsal part (tegmentum) and a ventral part (crus cerebri), which are separated by the substantia nigra.
peduncle disease
a disease of marine fish caused by the flexibacter Cytophaga psychrophila.
olfactory peduncle
caudal continuation of the olfactory bulb of the brain.
pineal peduncle
see habenula (2).
References in periodicals archive ?
Bilateral Wallerian degeneration of the medial cerebellar peduncles after ponto-mesencephalic infarction.
Only two fragments of the left pubis are preserved, comprising almost all the prepubic process, the iliac peduncle and acetabulum, whereas the postpubis and ischial peduncle are lost by breakage (Fig.
corymbosa is distinguished by the combination of nearly glabrate leaves with both the lamina and the petiole eglandular, very congested clusters of flowers, long slender peduncles and pedicels that are sericeous to glabrescent, eglandular bracteoles, the orbicular samara that is only broadly and shallowly emarginate at the apex, and the pilose disc below the fruit.
occurring singly or in groups of 2-3, reddish-golden to brownish-yellow tomentose, cylindrical to elongate conical-cylindrical, with round-acuminate apex of sterile sporophylls; peduncle 4-10 cm long, 0.
Pedunculata (stalked, or goose, barnacles) often extrude an excess of tough and solid adhesive (Walker and Youngson, 1975) by which they anchor the peduncle firmly in fissures of the substratum (pers.
Pollen strobili two to six per stem apex, to 14 x 3 cm, yellow-beige tomentose, peduncles to 6.
Regarding the fruit peduncle length, the longest peduncles were observed in the genotype P.
Inflorescence pendulous, 40-70 x 10-15 cm with 12 to 30 branches; primary bracts like the upper scape bracts but without the long blade, mostly apiculate, mostly shorter than the peduncles, grey-green to pink; branches spreading at ca 30[degrees] from the axis with an ebracteate 3-7 cm x 2-4 mm flattened peduncle that exceeds nearly all of the primary bracts; the fertile portion 4-8 x 1-2 cm, 4 to 10 flowered; floral bracts elliptic, acute, 20-26 x 8-10 mm nerved, variably carinate, tightly imbricate in life, spreading when dried, glabrous except for a few pale fimbriate trichomes at the very apex, bright magenta pink, somewhat glaucose.
Integument mostly smooth and shining with a few indistinct fossae on the anterior part of head and minutely and densely punctulate sculpture in lower sides of alitrunk, also in front and behind of petiolar peduncles (Brown & Kempf 1969).
Antennular peduncles stout, somewhat depressed dorsoventrally, contiguous, thus mesial faces flat; first segment unarmed on distolateral and distomesial margins; dorsal surface with low elevation proximolaterally, but without conspicuous proximolateral tubercle; stylocerite broad, closely appressed to peduncle, reaching distolateral angle of second segment, lateral margin notably convex; second segment nearly as long as broad to slightly longer than broad, with moderately large distomesial tooth.
Inside the stems, or peduncles, of the low-lignin lines, the lesions were shorter than those of the controls, suggesting bmr-6 and bmr-12's greater resistance.
The plant produces white flowers, which have medium/long peduncles.