pedogenesis

(redirected from pedogenetic)
Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia.

pe·do·gen·e·sis

(pē'dō-jen'ĕ-sis),
Permanent larval stage with sexual development, as in certain gall midges (genus Miastor). Compare: neoteny.
[G. pais (paid-), child, + genesis, origin]

pedogenesis

(pē′dō-jĕn′ĭ-sĭs)
n.

pe′do·ge·net′ic (-jə-nĕt′ĭk) adj.

pedogenesis

[pē′dōjen′əsis]
Etymology: Gk, pais, child, genesis, origin
the production of offspring by young or larval forms of animals, often by parthenogenesis, as in certain amphibians. Also spelled paedogenesis. -pedogenetic, adj.

pedogenesis

see PAEDOGENESIS.

pedogenesis

metamorphotic phenomenon of production of a number of separate individuals in an intermediate host, e.g. a snail, by a single larval form.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Moder-type ground litter and humus substances in the A-AC section represent the driving force for pedogenetic processes.
Progressive and regressive pedogenetic processes may be interrelated.
The simple uniformity of exchange properties and texture of different-aged Gleysols and mineral subsoils of Histosols confirm the former generalization that no pedogenetic differentiation takes place under aquic groundwater regimes and the layering of the solum depends on former geologic conditions and sedimentation.
This indicates that other pedogenetic processes are probably involved in the consolidation of cohesive soil horizons, as suggested by others (Lima et al.
To explain the formation of humus relationships and the pedogenetic activity of the herbaceous vegetation on reddish-brown calcareous till, a special experiment was established in 1963 under natural climatic conditions.
The strong pH oscillation between soils and depths reflects the heterogeneity and complexity of the pedogenetic processes.
Ridges are similar in pedogenetic terms to spurs (convexity, erosive part of the landscape), and therefore, ridges are considered to be similar m soil characteristics to spurs.
Such spatial information not only has the capacity to improve our understanding of aeolian dust deposition as a pedogenetic process, but may also be used to refine models of other environmental processes such as nutrient and salt dynamics.
Ojanuga AG (1969) Pedogenetic study of Hill-wash soils in the Precambrian Crystalline Basement Region of southwestern Nigeria.
Since forest soils have pedogenetic and biological processes very different from the agricultural or barren soils, the development of these PTFs on the soils of a specific ecosystem appeared to be one of the major reasons for their non-applicability to the test dataset soils from 4 diverse ecosystems.