pediculicide


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pediculicide

 [pĕ-dik´u-lĭ-sīd]
destroying lice.
an agent that destroys lice.

pe·dic·u·li·cide

(pĕ-dik'yū-li-sīd),
An agent used to destroy lice.
[L. pediculus, louse, + caedo, to kill]

pediculicide

/pe·dic·u·li·cide/ (pĕ-dik´u-lĭ-sīd)
1. destroying lice.
2. an agent that destroys lice.

pediculicide

[pədik′yoo͡lisīd′]
Etymology: L, pediculus, little foot, caedere, to kill
any of a group of drugs that kill lice.

pe·dic·u·li·cide

(pĕ-dik'yū-li-sīd)
A chemical agent used to kill lice.
[L. pediculus, louse, + caedo, to kill]

pediculicide

1. destroying lice.
2. an agent that destroys lice.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is no longer recommended as a pediculicide by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) (Eisenhower & Farrington, 2012).
Prescription pediculicides, including malathion (Ovide) and lindane (Kwell), are used less frequently due to their side effect profiles: Malathion is highly flammable due to a high alcohol content and lindane can cause neurotoxicity.
Thousands of bottles have been sold, and an abundance of satisfied customers attest to the success of the product, especially in cases for which pyrethrin-permethrin based pediculicides h ave failed.
Specially designed nit combs are often included with the OTC product or may be purchased separately at the store where you bought the pediculicide.
Pediculicide spray in the home is not necessary and should not be used.
To encourage compliance from parents, the nurse may find it useful to request the return of the empty pediculicide bottle as proof of treatment.
Natroba[TM] is a pediculicide approved by the FDA in January 2011 for the topical treatment of head lice infestations in patients four (4) years of age and older.
The three most common types of lice treatment products found on most first aid aisles, according to Vamousse, are pesticide-based treatments, pesticide-free treatments and pesticide-free pediculicides.
This product is both a pediculicide and an ovicide, killing both the lice and the nits.
A suffocation-based pediculicide developed by a dermatologist in his office may offer hope for regaining control over head lice, the bane of elementary school morns and the physicians they hound for a cure.
Combing wet hair with conditioner and a fine-tooth comb is four times more effective at curing pediculosis than water-based, over-the-counter pediculicide shampoos, Nigel Hill, Ph.
A "final rule" on over-the-counter (OTC) pediculicide drug products, issued by the Food and Drug Administration at the end of December, describes changes to the outside label, or carton, that the manufacturers of these products will have to make within 18 months (by the end of June 2005) to 24 months (January 2006), depending on the size of the company and the number of products they make.