pediculicide


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pediculicide

 [pĕ-dik´u-lĭ-sīd]
destroying lice.
an agent that destroys lice.

pe·dic·u·li·cide

(pĕ-dik'yū-li-sīd),
An agent used to destroy lice.
[L. pediculus, louse, + caedo, to kill]

pe·dic·u·li·cide

(pĕ-dik'yū-li-sīd)
A chemical agent used to kill lice.
[L. pediculus, louse, + caedo, to kill]
References in periodicals archive ?
It is no longer recommended as a pediculicide by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) (Eisenhower & Farrington, 2012).
Prescription pediculicides, including malathion (Ovide) and lindane (Kwell), are used less frequently due to their side effect profiles: Malathion is highly flammable due to a high alcohol content and lindane can cause neurotoxicity.
The children from whom these lice were collected had typically been treated unsuccessfully with pyrethrin/permethrin-based pediculicides, so these lice were probably pesticide-resistant.
Specially designed nit combs are often included with the OTC product or may be purchased separately at the store where you bought the pediculicide. Reusable (metal) combs can be cleaned with an old toothbrush and then soaked in boiling hot water.
Pediculicide spray in the home is not necessary and should not be used.
A no-nit policy encourages thorough nit removal concomitant with pediculicide treatment.
This product is both a pediculicide and an ovicide, killing both the lice and the nits.
-- A suffocation-based pediculicide developed by a dermatologist in his office may offer hope for regaining control over head lice, the bane of elementary school morns and the physicians they hound for a cure.
Combing wet hair with conditioner and a fine-tooth comb is four times more effective at curing pediculosis than water-based, over-the-counter pediculicide shampoos, Nigel Hill, Ph.D., and his colleagues reported.
A "final rule" on over-the-counter (OTC) pediculicide drug products, issued by the Food and Drug Administration at the end of December, describes changes to the outside label, or carton, that the manufacturers of these products will have to make within 18 months (by the end of June 2005) to 24 months (January 2006), depending on the size of the company and the number of products they make.
(5) In addition to the "Dear Parent" letter, parents of children with head lice should be given a treatment sheet to be filled out and returned with the box top from the pediculicide they used on their children.
Vamousse Lice Treatment is an example of a pesticide-free pediculicide and is "proven to kill eggs, dehydrating them with the treatment," according to the company.