pederin


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pederin

(pĕd′ĕ-rĭn) [Fm. the genus name]
An organic compound secreted by certain blister beetles of the genus Paederus as a form of defense against predators. It causes a blistering rash on contact with human skin. The compound may actually be manufactured by bacteria that colonize the beetle rather than by the beetle itself. Pederin kills tumor cells in laboratory experiments.
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In Bir Pederin Hatasi, Ayse Zekiye discusses polygamy and the relations between women of the same household.
Allocation of pederin during lifetime of Paederus rove beetles (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae): evidence for polymorphism of hemolymph toxin.
The beetle affects mostly the skin after contact with the body and releasing pederin toxins.
A string of suppurating sores appears when someone brushes away a beetle and inadvertently smears the insect and the toxin, pederin, across the skin.
Ivan Pederin, "Odnos beckoga dvora prema crkvenoj uniji u Dalmaciji dvadesetih godina 19.
Trowell says some small, brightly-coloured staphylinid beetles, commonly known as whiplash beetles, secrete a potent defensive compound called pederin.
INTRODUCTION: Paederus dermatitis, also known as dermatitis linearis or blister beetle dermatitis is a peculiar irritant contact dermatitis characterized by vesicles and bullae on an erythematous base on exposed areas of the body with sudden onset of burning and stinging sensation, provoked by an insect belonging to the genus Paederus, family Staphylinidae (rove beetles), order Coleoptera (beetles) after being crushed on the skin, releasing the hemolymph pederin. (1) Though common worldwide, it is most frequently seen in regions with a hot, tropical climate.
One or a combination of the vesicating chemicals pederin, pseudopederin, and pederone have been found in 20 species of Paederus (12) Pederin is the most common chemical of the three and is one of the most complex nonproteinaceous insect secretions known.
Exploring the chemistry of uncultivated bacterial symbionts: antitumor polyketides of the pederin family.
For instance, insects produce a prodigious array of defensive exudates, which are intensely odoriferous (e.g., E-2-hexenal, salicylaldehyde), highly reactive (e.g., benzoquinone), cytotoxic (e.g., formic acid), lesion-forming (can-tharidin, pederin), or hot and caustic (oxidized hydroquinones) (Eisner, 1970, 1980; Blum, 1981; Whitman et al., 1986; Whelan and Weir, 1987).
Correspondence to: Marija Pederin, LLM, Ministry of Health of the Republic Croatia, Ksaver 200 a, HR-10000 Zagreb, Croatia
Pederin, Ivan (2004) "Zidovsko pitanje u srednjoj Europi i Hrvatskoj u XI st".