pedal

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pedal

 [ped´'l]
pertaining to the foot or feet.

ped·al

(ped'ăl), Avoid the mispronunciation pē'dal. Avoid the redundant phrase foot pedal.
Relating to the feet, or to any structure called pes.
[L. pedalis, fr. pes (ped-), a foot]

pedal

/ped·al/ (ped´'l) pertaining to the foot or feet.

pedal

(pĕd′l)
adj.
(also pēd′l) Of or relating to a foot or footlike part: the pedal extremities.

ped′al·er, ped′al·ler n.

pedal

[ped′əl]
Etymology: L, pes, foot
pertaining to the foot.

ped·al

(ped'ăl)
Relating to the feet, or to any structure called pes.
[L. pedalis, fr. pes (ped-), a foot]

pedal

of or relating to the foot, particularly those of molluscs.

pedal (pēˑ·dl),

adj pertaining to the foot.

pedal

pertaining to the foot or feet.

pedal arthritis
seen most often in cattle with septic arthritis of the distal interphalangeal joint.
Enlarge picture
Septic pedal interphalangeal arthritis. By permission from Blowey RW, Weaver AD, Diseases and Disorders of Cattle, Mosby, 1997
pedal bone
the distal phalanx of ungulates, especially the horse.
pedal bone rotation
causing penetration of the sole of the horse's foot; a characteristic of severe laminitis.
pedal fracture
fractures of the pedal bone occur most commonly in horses. They may involve a wing or extensor process. They are usually transverse in cattle.
pedal osteitis
a rarefying osteitis of the pedal bone in the foot of the horse. Causes local pain and lameness.
References in periodicals archive ?
The present benefit provided by the non-circular chainring on pedalling kinetics differed depending on the sprint phase.
In contrast, the non-circular chainring significantly changed pedalling kinetics during the pedal downstroke at maximal velocity, with significantly higher Finstmax (+7%).
The three fullest treatments of pedalling in early pedagogical works, those of Johann Peter Milchmeyer (1797), Louis Adam (1804), and Steibelt (1809), are transcribed in English translation in an appendix, but they are surprisingly unhelpful in revealing the actual state of the art at that critical period.
me Pot Pourri (1793), composed for his Paris audience, is the first work to contain pedalling instructions for the sustaining and lute (or harp) pedals, both found on French square pianos of the day.
He has written on a number of aspects of early piano performance: his book on pianoforte pedalling is published by Cambridge University Press.