pectin


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Related to pectin: gelatin

pectin

 [pek´tin]
a one-sugar polymer of sugar acids of fruit that forms gels with sugar at the proper pH. A purified form from the rind of citrus fruits or from apple pomace is used as the protective component of formulations used in treatment of diarrhea and as a suspending agent in pharmaceutical preparations. It is also used in preparation of foods such as jams and jellies.

pec·tin

(pek'tin), Do not confuse this word with pecten.
1. Broad generic term for what are now more correctly called pectic substances or materials; specifically, a gelatinous substance, consisting largely of long chains of mostly d-galacturonic acid units (typically α-1,4 linkages and sometimes present as methyl esters), which is extracted from fruits where it is presumed to exist as protopectin (pectose).
2. Commercial pectins, sometimes called pectinic acids, are whitish, soluble powders prepared from the rinds of citrus fruits. They are used in the preparation of jams, jellies, and similar food products where they increase viscosity; therapeutically, they are used to control diarrhea (usually in conjunction with other agents), as a plasma expander, and as a protectant; pectins bind calcium ions and are highly hydrated.

pectin

/pec·tin/ (pek´tin) a polymer of sugar acids of fruit that forms gels with sugar at the proper pH; a purified form obtained from the acid extract of the rind of citrus fruits or from apple pomace is used as an antidiarrheal and as a pharmaceutic aid.pec´tic

pectin

(pĕk′tĭn)
n.
Any of a group of water-soluble colloidal carbohydrates of high molecular weight found in ripe fruits, such as apples, plums, and grapefruit, and used to jell various foods, drugs, and cosmetics.

pec′tic, pec′tin·ous adj.

pectin

[pek′tin]
Etymology: Gk, pektos, congealed
a gelatinous carbohydrate substance found in fruits and succulent vegetables and used as the setting agent for jams and jellies and as an emulsifier and stabilizer in many foods. It also adds to the diet bulk necessary for proper GI functioning. See also dietary fiber.

pectin

Alternative health
A soluble fibre found in fruits (e.g., apples, grapefruit and vegetables). Pectin is antidiarrhoeal, demulcent and used to soothe the mouth and throat, reduce colic and diarrhoea, and reduces LDL-cholesterol.

Food industry
A heterogeneous family of highly branched, highly hydrated and glucuronic acid-rich fruit-based polysaccharides used to produce gelling agents.

pec·tin

(pek'tin) Do not confuse this word with pecten.
1. Broad generic term for what are now more correctly called pectic substances or materials.
2. Commercial pectins, sometimes called pectinic acids, are whitish, soluble powders prepared from the rinds of citrus fruits; to make jams, jellies, and similar food products where they increase viscosity; therapeutically, used to control diarrhea, as a plasma expander, and as a protectant.

pectin

a complex POLYSACCHARIDE often found as calcium pectate in plant cells where it is a component of the MIDDLE LAMELLA of the cell wall. When heated, pectin forms a gel which can ‘set’, a feature used in the making of jams.

pectin,

n pectin is a gummy polysaccharide constituent of the cell walls of plants that is used as a thickening agent in jams and jellies. Pectin's mucilaginous qualities are useful in treating diarrhea and high cholesterol and it may have beneficial effects on radiation sickness as well.

pec·tin

(pek'tin)
Broad generic term for what are now more correctly called pectic substancesor materials; specifically, a gelatinous sub stance, which is extracted from fruits where it is presumed to exist as protopectin (pectose).

pectin

a homosaccharidic polymer of sugar acids of fruit, which forms gels with sugar at the proper pH; a purified form obtained from the acid extract of the rind of citrus fruits or from apple pomace is used as a protectant and in cooking. Has a gelatinizing capacity and may be important in stabilizing the foam in frothy bloat.

pectin methyl esterase
a plant enzyme thought to have significance in the cause of bloat in cattle because of its role in the digestion of pectin and liberation of frothing agents pectic and galacturonic acids.
References in periodicals archive ?
When commercially extracted pectin was introduced in the United States in the 1920s, cooks embraced this new convenience product.
Preserves: Fruit or vegetables that have been coarsely crushed, cut into chunks, or left whole and preserved in their own juices, which form a jelly or jam consistency Some may have sugar and pectin added.
The increasing demand of energy has now focused on the use of renewable energy resources like cellulose, starch, lignin, xylan and pectin due to their abundance throughout the environment.
Industrial pectin products are extracted from natural plant-based raw materials at low pH using an addition of mineral acid to create controlled acidity.
Most people have heard of pectin as a gelling agent used in fruit preserves and jellies.
And here's something else amazing: Even though modified citrus pectin is strong enough to soak up toxins and heavy metals like a sponge, it's also so gentle on your system that not a single person in these human trials reported any side effects
While plant pectins have long been known to support digestive and immune health through their actions in the GI tract, the main obstacle preventing them from exerting systemic benefits in the body has been their bio-availability.
While Andre Pectin continually optimizes its costs along the entire value chain, the impact of such external pressure can no longer be offset, by improving process efficiency alone.
Summary: A Box-Behnken design was employed to study the combined effects of variables of microwave-assisted extraction on pectin from sugar beet pulp.
Royal DSM, the global Life Sciences and Materials Sciences company, announced today that it has completed the acquisition of a 19% equity interest in Yantai Andre Pectin Co.