peak expiratory flow rate


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peak expiratory flow rate

Maximum expiratory flow, peak flow The greatest rate of airflow that can be obtained during forced exhalation, which follows a diurnal pattern of fluctuation and can be used clinically to evaluate airway tone; PEF is ↓–and airway tone ↑ in various forms of asthma; it can be plotted during the day and used to investigate occupational asthma and detect exacerbation before the onset of Sx. See Pulmonary function tests.

peak ex·pi·ra·to·ry flow rate

(PEFR) (pēk ek-spīr'ă-tōr-ē flō rāt)
The maximum flow at the outset of forced expiration, which is reduced in proportion to the severity of airway obstruction, as in asthma.

peak expiratory flow rate

The maximum rate of exhalation during a forced expiration, measured in liters per second or liters per minute. It is used as a test of airway obstruction.
See also: rate
References in periodicals archive ?
Screening test: Test has high Peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) detection rate and specificity.
Peak Expiratory Flow Rate (PEFR) recorded on Wrights peak flow meter is commonly used for screening individuals with chronic airway obstruction both in clinical and in field studies.
Peak expiratory flow rate and arterial oxygen pressure ([PaO.sub.2]) are lower when dyspnea is caused by a pulmonary disorder than when the source is a cardiac disorder.
Table 3: Standard deviation, mean, and difference in mean values of peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) and mean forced expiratory flow between 25% and 75% of forced vital capacity (FEF 25-75) in pregnant and nonpregnant women Parameters Mean [+ or -] Standard Deviation Pregnant Nonpregnant PEFR (L/s) 457.11 [+ or -] 80.65 441.90 [+ or -] 92.54 FEF 25-75 (L/s) 330.30 [+ or -] 49.33 304.67 [+ or -] 65.54 Parameters Difference between Percentage both groups change PEFR (L/s) + 15.21 + 3.44 FEF 25-75 (L/s) + 25.36 + 8.32 Parameters Significant/ nonsignificant PEFR (L/s) Nonsignificant (p > 0.05) FEF 25-75 (L/s) Nonsignificant (p > 0.05) Note: "+" denotes mean reading is more and "-" denotes that the mean reading is less in the two groups.
We have found that there is a significant difference between the decline of peak expiratory flow rate in smokers and non-smokers (p<0.001).
Both the intervention and the control group patients demonstrated small but statistically significant improvement in peak expiratory flow rate (from 410.7 to 419.1 L/min in the intervention group, and from 417.8 to 427.4 L/min in the control group), and a substantial reduction in inhaled corticosteroid use during the study period (47% in the intervention group and 48% in the control group).
A low peak expiratory flow rate is not specific for COPD, as it may result from poor performance.
Once the procedure was done, values for FVC, forced expiratory volume in the 1st s (FEV1), FEV1/FVC, peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR), and forced expiratory flow (FEF 25%-75%) were obtained after analyzing flow volume and time volume curve.
The peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) was recorded using Wright's peak flow meter.
The recordings before exercise, exercise and 30 minutes after end of exercise of Forced Vital Capacity (FVC), Forced Expiratory Volume in first second (FEV-1) and Peak Expiratory Flow Rate (PEFR) were measured using a digital spirometer.
Eight different asthma-related outcomes were considered: lung function as measured by forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FE[V.sub.1]) or peak expiratory flow rate, number of days absent from school, number of days of restricted activity, number of disturbed nights, self-efficacy scales, symptom scores, number of visits to an emergency department, and hospitalizations.
A patient in the "green zone" (80%-100% of personal best peak expiratory flow rate) has good control and is doing well.