poverty

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pov·er·ty

peniaphobia.

poverty

[pov′ərtē]
Etymology: L, paupertas
1 a lack of material wealth needed to maintain existence.
2 a loss of emotional capacity to feel love or sympathy.

poverty

The state of being deprived of the essentials of well-being, such as adequate housing, food, sufficient income, employment, access to required social services and social status. The most commonly used threshold of low income in the UK is a household income that is ≤ 60% of the average (median) British household income. In 2008/9, poverty was defined in terms of the amount of money left after income tax, council tax and housing costs (rent, mortgage interest, buildings insurance and water charges) have been deducted: £119 per week for single adult with no dependent children and £288 per week for a couple with two dependent children under 14. These sums of money represent what the household has left to spend on food, heating, travel, entertainment, and any needs or wants. In 2008/09, 13 million people in the UK were living in households below this low-income threshold—i.e., 22% of the population—compared 12 million at that level in 2004/05.

poverty

(pov′ĕrt-ē) [Fr. poverté, fr L. paupertas]
The condition of having an inadequate supply of money, resources, or means of subsistence. In 2010 in the U.S., for example, a family of four earning less than $22,000 was considered to live in poverty.

poverty of thought

The mental state of being devoid of thought and having a feeling of emptiness.
References in periodicals archive ?
Poor sections of the city quickly built new workhouses they could hot previously afford, helping to sustain London's unique pauper experiences.
102) Fanny Taylor, who eventually became a nun, praised Irish female philanthropists, especially Catholic ones, for their work with pauper inmates and female prisoners, and asserted that the problem with the Irish was that the English government was not loved or trusted.
the act-two opener, finds our three heroes (prince, pauper and Hendon) all comically coming to grips with their various predicaments.
This study shows that after 1844 a better regulated system was accepted despite the Commissioners' desire to abolish the apprenticeship of pauper children.
The idea that the poor were in the image of Christ ended when bad harvests, famine, plague, and runaway inflation--striking at various times from the thirteenth through the sixteenth centuries--produced an army of ragtag paupers who wandered from town to town begging, stealing, and assaulting.
The data, which are derived from the manuscript censuses of social statistics of 1850 and 1860, are sufficiently rich to permit us to estimate an econometric model of pauper rates at the county level.
Members of the West Bromwich Union Pauper Memorial Group were behind the plant to honour the anonymous dead has finally come to fruition.
IT sounds like something out of the Victorian age but pauper funerals are not a thing of the past.
THE Mayor and Mayoress of St Helens, Councillor Geoff and Jean Almond, unveiled a memorial stone to the thousands of children buried in pauper graves.
He was admitted to the pauper hospital on New Buildings (near Nando's.
Also very highly recommended are the other titles in this outstanding series from Peter Pauper Press: "Ready, Set, Draw .
She died in 1860 after leaving Crimea five years earlier with failing health, and was buried as a pauper in a communal grave with four other people in a forgotten corner of with Betsi Cadwaladr Health Board campaigning for a memorial for the nursing heroine.