patrilineal

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Related to patrilinear: patrilineal

patrilineal

 [pah-trĭ-lin´e-al]
descended through the male line.

pat·ri·lin·e·al

(pat'ri-lin'ē-ăl),
Related to descent through the male line; inheritance of the Y chromosome is exclusively patrilineal.
[L. pater, father, + linea, line]

pat·ri·lin·e·al

(pat'ri-lin'ē-ăl)
Related to descent through the male line; inheritance of the Y chromosome is exclusively patrilineal.
[L. pater, father, + linea, line]
References in periodicals archive ?
The son now happily occupies the place of the father, suggesting a successful integration of the previously traumatized narrator into the patrilinear chain.
The prevalence of polygamy (and the ranking of wives and widows) maintains women in a subordinate position, whether among the matrilineal Akan-speaking peoples or in such patrilinear societies as the Ewe, the Ga, the Tallensi, and the many societies of the North (Nukunya 1992).
A patrilinear society at the heart of a centralized state like that of the Yoruba or the Buganda differs in terms of its foundations from the palabre of a lineage-based society like the Beti of Cameroon, the Lobis of Burkina, or the Bwa of Mali.
This view of the patrilinear succession from Yeats is endorsed by Eamonn Hughes's treatment of Autobiographies.
Before confronting this issue, however, Dryden underscores the horrors surrounding the debasement of England's patrilinear monarchy by the Glorious Revolution and by the Dutch prince himself.
Breytenbach, the self-styled "albino in a white land," the "white kaffir," renounces his patriarchal allegiance by asserting, "I am not an Afrikaner any more" ("Breyten Breytenbach" 6).(10) The power of this speech act is not lost in as patrilinear a society as South Africa; yet when its echoes are heard in the formula Breytenbach proposes for Mr.
From the beginning the author subverts the controlling mechanisms of language and patrilinear progression by metaphorically dismembering the paternal body, the corpus of structures based on deferral and substitution that organize the symbolic.
The unstable relationships between men and women, the subversion of reproduction possibilities, and the threat to patrilinear succession suggested by ambiguous gender are specifically the concerns that motivate the decision to disguise the identity of the heroine in the Roman de Silence.
Turning toward the discursive texts, as she calls them, Abel enters A Room of One's Own as "Woolf's most complete and complex interpretation of matrilineage," "also her last." In its late thirties' "sequel," Three Guineas, Abel argues Woolf has definitively moved from "matrilinear to patrilinear definitions of the daughter"; "the discursive texts resituate her career, and its diverse intersections with psychoanalysis, within the social history of gender." This move, Abel argues, is overdetermined by the intersecting histories of both feminism and fascism.
The central argument concerns the literary presentation of the mother and her incorporation in either a patrilinear or a matrilinear genealogical chain.
(8) Naomi Segal, "Patrilinear and Matrilinear," in The Body and the Text: Helene Cixous, Reading and Teaching, ed.
That 'centrum' which is the very center of the female abdomen, spatio-temporally binding generations from its line, generations which, be they matrilinear or patrilinear, spring from its entrails--is nonetheless a 'surplus.' Featuring Woman all the while that it displaces her, it leaves the 'center' wide open and just as empty, because women in their spatio-temporal presence are just as absent from it.