patrilineal


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patrilineal

 [pah-trĭ-lin´e-al]
descended through the male line.

pat·ri·lin·e·al

(pat'ri-lin'ē-ăl),
Related to descent through the male line; inheritance of the Y chromosome is exclusively patrilineal.
[L. pater, father, + linea, line]

pat·ri·lin·e·al

(pat'ri-lin'ē-ăl)
Related to descent through the male line; inheritance of the Y chromosome is exclusively patrilineal.
[L. pater, father, + linea, line]
References in periodicals archive ?
Based on the patrilineal and patrilocal systems of society, family survival strategies are contingent upon household economic resources that may disadvantage girls.
While there are 'multiple pathways' (Myers 1982:188) leading to connections to country, there is a particular emphasis on 'complementary filiation' (Fortes 1969:98)--that is, rights and duties counterbalancing those attendant on patrilineal descent and directed towards one's mother's relatives and their country (or countries) of orientation.
Manrique muestra como la fuerte ideologia androcentrica se superpone a una organizacion bilateral del parentesco, lo cual habria transfigurado a los ojos de varios investigadores un sistema de filiacion cognatico a un sistema patrilineal (2008: 24).
Confusion about the baby's identity offers a muted parallel to the confusion about Joe's possible drop of black blood, but also offers the possibility that racial and patrilineal ambiguity need not constitute a "burden" of difference and alienation.
Schwarz's own writing is enviably aphoristic (see, for example, "Misogyny dismisses constant women as figments of a hopeful imagination, but patrilineal succession relies on their substantial presence" [110]).
The desire to preserve patrilineal inheritance for the eldest son meant that girls within families were often the victims of dowry inflation and sent to convents or various charitable institutions, as a means of preserving their honour and reputation.
Reid, for his part, shows how important the family name has been in the development of patrilineal and patrilocal family structures seeking to consolidate wealth and power.
The lineage of the British and Bulgarian royal families is traced back to Francis, Duke of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld (1750-1806), the patrilineal ancestor of Elizabeth II of Britain, Albert II of Belgium, and Simeon II of Bulgaria, and his wife Auguste.
Should it be done by way of matrilineal (according to the halakhic rules followed by all branches of Orthodox Judaism and Conservative Judaism) or patrilineal descent (as in the Biblical period) or any of the two lineages (as in Reform Judaism in the former Soviet Union, and according to German immigration authorities until 2005)?
Haber's discussion, for instance, of how the Duchess transforms the gendered syntax of "enter" (in contrast to Ferdinand, who "enters" the Duchess's chamber clutching his father's "poniard" as a phallic sign of patrilineal privilege, the Duchess "enters" Antonio "into my heart")--demonstrates a keen eye for the telling textual or lexical detail that limns an ecriture feminine no longer confined just to pregnant bodies, and open instead to modes of destabilization not limited to biological reproduction (80).
"Eritrean Afars, also known as Dankils, live mainly along the southeastern sea coast and on the offshore islands in a highly-segmented, patrilineal society.