patricide


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pat·ri·cide

(pat'ri-sīd),
1. The killing of one's father.
2. One who commits such an act. Compare: matricide.
[L. pater, father, + caedō, to kill]

patricide

The killing of one’s father.

patricide

(păt′rĭ-sīd) [L. patricida]
Murder of one's father or another close relative.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The critical disjunction on this issue underscores Griffith's acknowledgement of the contradiction in Attic politics between the unbridled authority of the father and the rotating and temporary power of civic magistrates; that is, Haemon's attempted patricide puts into play the contradictory political dialectic embodied in his person and its analogy to gender, which has already motivated the bitterness of their agon.
Emphasis added.) Here, C2 perceives Ajatasatru's meeting with the Buddha and receiving the teaching as the key ingredient in avoiding the consequences of the action of patricide. However, there is again some ambiguity in the way the let-off is phrased.
Engaging with Kristeva's ideas, Nikolchina writes that "There is no symmetry between patricide and matricide; patricide produces lineage; matricide is perpetuated as erasure of the 'name of the mother'" (3).
Yet the shift in Egypt's psyche since its symbolic patricide demands assessment.
Moreover, they perfect the picture with a literal patricide as well, recounting the murder of Sutpen in detail, a description unworthy of a colonel.
A law against the killing of kin (patricide), attributed to Numa Pompilius, suggests that during the regal period the ruler had power of life and death over his subjects and that homicide constituted an attack on his authority as well as an offense against the gods.
Homicide and Patricide: A person, who in full knowledge of the relationship that ties them kills a father, mother or child, be they legitimate or illegitimate, any other ascendant or descendant or their spouse, shall be tried with the crime of patricide.
His thoughtful and heartfelt interpretation of Brahms's emotionally complex work based on a Scottish ballad of patricide is admirable.
"It is a welcomed attempt at patricide." Similarly, calls for "regeneration" and "rebirth" have suffused the mock-revolutionary jargon, with some going as far as to declare these protests as "the renaissance of the Israeli spirit" and "Israel's second Independence Day." Itzhik Shmuli, the head of the national student union, has been even more explicit about his generation's newfound and self-congratulatory sense of empowerment: "From now on, the young people will shape the government's vision."
At London's Appeal Court, Lord Chief Justice, Lord Judge, described the sisters' crime as "a chilling offence of patricide" and ruled there could be no criticism of their sentences.
Cultural Catholics stay because the religion offers a replacement family (complete with celibate "'Fathers" and "Mothers Superior") that provides a "new lease on life" (156) and eases guilt from the original imaginative patricide.
As signifier, Roy generates multiple homogenous and heterogeneous signifieds: Christ and anti-Christ; Nietzsche's splendid blonde beast and abject slave; favorite son and patricide; Hegelian/Marxist revolutionary and alien terrorist.