patricide


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pat·ri·cide

(pat'ri-sīd),
1. The killing of one's father.
2. One who commits such an act. Compare: matricide.
[L. pater, father, + caedō, to kill]

patricide

The killing of one’s father.

patricide

(păt′rĭ-sīd) [L. patricida]
Murder of one's father or another close relative.
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References in periodicals archive ?
And yet one key forensic puzzle-piece still remains: the prophet Teiresias's accusations concerning Oedipus's guilt of patricide and incest.
Although actual patricide remains in the realm of fantasy, both protagonists eventually subvert their father's authority.
Perhaps the motif of patricide in Lo spasimo di Palermo provides the clearest example of how Consolo contests such rhetoric.
However, this patricide also entailed "significant costs, including the loneliness of the fatherless son and the burden of adult responsibilities.
Inspired by Sophocles' play, Oedipus Rex, Enescu's opera (with a French libretto by Edmond Fleg) tells the story of Oedipus from birth, through his patricide, his incestuous relationship with his mother, his blinding and death.
In Chapter 2 and elsewhere, Griffin relies on Freud, particularly his narrative of patricide in Totem and Taboo, to support her claim that anti-Catholicism provides a way to articulate historically and politically specific "generational struggles": "[T]he Catholic Church's claims of historical prerogative position it as nineteenth-century Protestantism's primal father.
Patricide is a bad idea, first, because it is contrary to law and custom and second because it proves, beyond a doubt, that the father's every fluted accusation against you was correct: you are a thoroughly bad individual, a patricide
Ultimately, it is this conflation of creation and sight that results in patricide.
Christmas's familial transgression of (possible) patricide is
In the last two years of his life Russians enjoyed the monthly numbers of The Brothers Karamazov, the novel centred on patricide, which Prof.
Death of a Salesman stages a patricide needed for the regeneration of an American dream in which Miller has never stopped believing, but it fails to offer a new world.
The sins of patricide and of incest inhere in the act itself, regardless of personal culpability.