pathosis

pa·tho·sis

(pă-thō'sis),
Rarely used term for a state of disease, diseased condition, or disease entity.
[patho- + G. -osis, condition]

pathosis

A nonspecific term for any disease “state”; this term is used neither in the primary literature nor in the working medical parlance.

pa·tho·sis

(pă-thō'sis)
Rarely used term for a state of disease, diseased condition, or disease entity.
[patho- + G. -osis, condition]
References in periodicals archive ?
Participants were eligible for inclusion if they met the following criteria: a) teeth with deep caries lesions and associated interradicular and/or periapical radiolucencies; b) caries-affected teeth with abnormal mobility due to periapical pathosis, but not associated with normal exfoliation; c) history of spontaneous pain; d) teeth presenting with intra-oral swelling or draining sinus tract; e) continuous bleeding after amputation of coronal pulp tissue; and f) teeth with external physiological or pathological resorption involving less than one third of the root length.
The risk factors for alveolar bone loss include caries, food impaction, pulp pathosis, calculus formation and periodontal status.
Radiographic assessment of impacted teeth and associated pathosis prevalence.
External resorption from pulp necrosis and periradicular pathosis III.
And the cop with nine lives The Rao Anwar episode underlines the pathosis that has overtaken the police force in Pakistan, particularly in Sindh and Punjab.
The specific endodontic applications of CBCT include the diagnosis of pathosis from endodontic and nonendodontic origins, assessment of root canal morphology, evaluation of root and alveolar fractures, analysis of internal and external root resorption, and presurgical planning in root-end surgeries.
Immediate dentures are contraindicated for patients with acute periapical or periodontal pathosis.
(x) Unexplained bifurcation bone loss: furcation bone loss may occur in molars with root fracture, in the absence of apical pathosis or over a periodontal disease and without any apparent reason like root perforation.
Clinicians should know about this disease entity to make accurate diagnosis for the improved treatment outcome of teeth showing periapical pathosis. The presence of cemental tears might be considered when endodontic treatment of the affected tooth fails to heal sinus tracts or in the presence of localized periodontal defects.
The question of whether the world is at risk of the "Japan disease" mirrors the difficulties that an infectious disease specialist would have in identifying a pathosis that should have devastated any other patient years, if not decades, ago.
The diagnosis was verified by the absence of radiographic evidence of periapical pathosis. Endodontic treatment was indicated for these patients, and confirmation of compliance with the inclusion criteria was assessed.
Thus, it provides the clinician with great detail and much information and proving the presence of any previously undiagnosed pathosis or any odontogenic aetiology of pain.