pathomechanics

pathomechanics

(path?o-mi-kan'i-ks)
Changes in the normal biomechanical function of a joint, an extremity, or the torso as the result of trauma or disease. See: biomechanics
References in periodicals archive ?
An anatomic and mechanical study of the interosseous membrane of the forearm: pathomechanics of proximal migration of the radius.
Children of educated parents had shown better results, as they could understand the pathomechanics and importance of plaster care.
Here are some known examples listed, many of which require further in depth discussion to fully appreciate potential value, effectiveness and pathomechanics of how they actually work.
Craig, "The geyser sign and torn rotator cuff: clinical significance and pathomechanics," Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research, vol.
Lower extremity pathomechanics during high impact activity, such as directional changes, landing, and deceleration, have been associated with increased risk of injury in athletes playing team sports (Griffin et al., 2006; Hewett et al., 2005), especially in young female athletes (Myer et al., 2013).
Functional Anatomy, Pathomechanics, and Pathophysiology of Lateral Ankle Instability.
Using this system, we were able to study the effects of mechanical stimulation on the biology of IVDs, as well as the pathomechanics of IVD degeneration.
Thomas Michaud specializes in biomechanical and gait disorders and is the author of numerous hook chapters andjournal articles on a variety of subjects ranging from biomechanics of the first metatarsophalangeal joint and shoulder, to the pathomechanics and management of vertebral artery dissection.
It is therefore critical to understand the pathomechanics at work and apply these principles to patient care, such as physical therapy and rehabilitation.