pathologist


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Related to pathologist: clinical pathologist, speech pathologist

pathologist

 [pah-thol´o-jist]
a specialist in some kind of pathology; for specific types, see under the name.

pa·thol·o·gist

(pa-thol'ŏ-jist),
A specialist in pathology; a physician who practices, evaluates, or supervises diagnostic tests, using materials removed from living or dead patients, and functions as a laboratory consultant to clinicians, or who conducts experiments or other investigations to determine the causes or nature of disease changes.

pathologist

[pəthol′əjist]
a physician specializing in the study of disease. A pathologist usually specializes in autopsy or in clinical or surgical pathology.

pathologist

A physician trained in evaluating tissues–surgical pathology, cells–cytology and/or lab medicine-clinical pathology, to render a diagnosis Average salary $190 K. See Cytologist/cytopathologist, Dermatopathologist, Forensic pathologist, Hematopathologist, Histopathologist, Immunohematopathologist, Immunopathologist, Neuropathologist, Speech pathologist.

pa·thol·o·gist

(pă-thol'ŏ-jist)
A specialist in pathology; a physician who performs, interprets, or supervises diagnostic tests, using materials removed from living or dead patients, and functions as a laboratory consultant to clinicians, or who conducts experiments or other investigations to determine the causes or nature of disease changes.

Pathologist

A doctor who specializes in the anatomic (structural) and chemical changes that occur with diseases. These doctors function in the laboratory, examining biopsy specimens, and regulating studies performed by the hospital laboratories (blood tests, urine tests, etc). Pathologists also perform autopsies.

pathologist

a specialist in pathology.
References in periodicals archive ?
Already, a large health care insurer is implementing a program that will require subspecialty pathologist review of certain kinds of cases.
The GE research results showed that less than 50% of people surveyed in the US understood the pathologist role in diagnosing breast cancer compared to 78% of respondents in Russia and less than 20% of respondents in Japan and Korea.
Pathologists still use microscopes as the gold standard for detecting and diagnosing cancer.
Roger Der, pathologist and associate director of pathology and clinical laboratory; Dr.
This partnership between U of R, Monroe County Executive Cheryl Dinolfo, and the Monroe County Medical Examiner office, is creating a national model to significantly increase the number of forensic pathologists now, in such short supply.
It is the professional obligation of every pathologist to be involved in some level of advocacy.
Even if you have never really heard about pathologists and the work they do, the benefits of having one in the community are numerous due to their essential role in correctly identifying and diagnosing various diseases.
But a month later, following a second post-mortem by another pathologist, he altered the cause of death to a brain haemorrhage.
As the number of cases and resulting tissue samples requiring evaluation by pathologists increases, and the number of diagnostic tests deployed for grading and other tests for cancer grows, the use of digital pathology technologies, like the NEC e-Pathologist, become an important component of improved patient care.
Also presented are reasons why a Speech-Language Pathologist would be willing to engage in the Verbal Behavior Approach over other treatment methods.
Pathologists dissected each animal to detect any cancers.
Will confocal endoscopy render pathologists obsolete, or will pathologists need to be stationed in the endoscopy suite for instantaneous interpretation of confocal images?