pathologic calcification

path·o·log·ic cal·ci·fi·ca·tion

calcification occurring in excretory or secretory passages as calculi, and in tissues other than bone and teeth.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

path·o·log·ic cal·ci·fi·ca·tion

(path'ŏ-loj'ik kal'si-fi-kā'shŭn)
Calcification occurring in excretory or secretory passages as calculi, and in tissues other than bone and teeth.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Kempf, "Pathologic calcification of adult vascular smooth muscle cells differs on their crest or mesodermal embryonic origin," Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, vol.
Pathologic calcification or ossification refers to the process by which calcium salts build up in soft tissue, causing it to harden and form extraskeletal bone.
Cutting-edge research points to the central role of two key nutrients to ensure optimal calcification of your bones while preventing pathologic calcification of your arteries: vitamins D and K.
Increased serum phosphate concentrations and increases in the calcium x phosphate ion product induce mineralization and are a risk factor for pathologic calcification (34).
No abnormal air fluid levels, free intraperitoneal air, or pathologic calcifications were seen.