pathogenicity


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pathogenicity

 [path″o-jĕ-nis´ĭ-te]
the quality of producing or the ability to produce pathologic changes or disease.

path·o·ge·nic·i·ty

(path'ō-jĕ-nis'i-tē),
The condition or quality of being pathogenic, or the ability to cause disease.

pathogenicity

[-jənis′itē]
the ability of a pathogenic agent to produce a disease.

path·o·ge·nic·i·ty

(path'ō-jĕ-nis'i-tē)
The condition or quality of being pathogenic, or the ability to cause disease.

pathogenicity

the ability of a pathogenic agent to produce disease in a host. See also virulence.
References in periodicals archive ?
There have been no previous reports about the pathogenicity of novel reassortant H5N8 isolates in wild birds and domestic ducks.
UTI: Urinary tract infection; UPEC: Uropathogenic Escherichia coli; Usp: Uropathogenic specific protein; PAI: Pathogenicity island; ORF: Open reading frame; PCR: Polymerase chain reaction.
How the virally increased pathogenicity arises is now a fascinating question in its own right," Beverley says.
Under normal conditions, pathogenicity islands produce the protein Stl, which binds to the DNA segment containing virulent genes and represses the transfer of the island.
Pathogenicity may also be affected by how long a host species has interacted with a virus.
12) around this time, which confirmed the pathogenicity of outbreak-associated strains of EPEC that had been identified by O-serogroup alone and which lacked the virulence determinants of ETEC and EIEC, failed to convince many of the sceptics.
Dr Olsen tests 10,000 birds a year and typically finds that ten per cent of dabbling ducks and one per cent of geese are infected with low pathogenicity bird flu.
The mutant viruses replicate in vivo but demonstrate reduced pathogenicity, and therefore are well suited for live virus vaccines, and pharmaceutical formulations.
However, questions remain regarding the viability and pathogenicity of those bacteria.