pathogen


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pathogen

 [path´o-jen]
any disease-producing agent or microorganism. adj., adj pathogen´ic.

path·o·gen

(path'ō-jen),
Any virus, microorganism, or other substance causing disease.
[patho- + G. -gen, to produce]

pathogen

/patho·gen/ (path´ah-jen) any disease-producing agent or microorganism.pathogen´ic

pathogen

(păth′ə-jən)
n.
An agent that causes disease, especially a virus, bacterium, or fungus.

pathogen

[path′əjən]
Etymology: Gk, pathos, disease, genein, to produce
any microorganism capable of producing disease. pathogenic, adj.

pathogen

Any disease-producing microorganism.

pathogen

Popularly, bug Any disease-producing microorganism. See Blood-borne pathogen, Emerging pathogen, Food-borne pathogen, Intracellular pathogen, Water-borne pathogen.

path·o·gen

(path'ŏ-jĕn)
Any virus, microorganism, or other substance that causes disease.
[patho- + G. -gen, to produce]

pathogen

Any agent that causes disease, especially a micro-organism.

pathogen

or

pathogene

any organism that causes disease, such as a virus, bacterium or fungus.

Pathogen

Any disease-producing agent or microorganism.

pathogen

microorganism (bacteria, fungus or virus) capable of overcoming host resistance, to cause disease

path·o·gen

(path'ŏ-jĕn)
Any virus, microorganism, or other substance causing disease.
[patho- + G. -gen, to produce]

pathogen (path´ojən),

n a microorganism responsible for causing disease.
pathogen, opportunistic,
n an infectious agent that can only cause disease when the host's resistance is low.

pathogen

any disease-producing agent or microorganism.

pathogen risk factors
risk factors dependent on the characteristics of the pathogen, e.g. virulence or persistence in the environment of a bacterium or virus.
References in periodicals archive ?
Many experts see sequencing as the future for clinical laboratory diagnostics, but while this breakthrough technology holds exciting potential, there are some important cautions to consider before adopting NGS for pathogen diagnosis.
Sclerotium cepivorum Berk, [white rot; Sclerotiniacea, Helotiales (Xu el aL, 2010)] is a fungal pathogen that infects plants in the genus Allium.
Industrialized nations' new taste for exotic food has also been linked with various zoonotic pathogens or parasites, such as protozoa (Toxoplasma), trematodes (Fasciola sp.
Underground-drip irrigation minimizes contamination risks because the water, which may carry pathogens, isn't applied directly to the edible portions of most plants that will be eaten raw.
0 for those with only exposure to oral pathogens, said Dr.
In cases of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection, treatment eradicated the pathogen in 223 of 232 cases, (96.
But what makes the food biotechnology debate so intriguing is that, unlike the issue of foodborne pathogens in meat, it's hardly a black and white story of a greedy industry threatening public safety.
Contact with urine and stool should be avoided, because other pathogens (such as CMV or diarrhea causative agents) can be spread via these fluids.
A review of the literature suggests that, in terms of risk, significant concentrations of human pathogens could be expected in sludges applied to agricultural land.
This may lead to a much more complex system, such as that occurring in gene-for-gene interactions involving the cereal stem rust Puccinia graminis, a serious pathogen of wheat crops.
They have published widely on the control of foodborne pathogens.
Decades ago, scientists began wondering how breast milk stops the pathogens that cause diarrhea.