pathergy


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pathergy

 [path´er-je]
1. an abnormal reaction to an allergen, either a subnormal reaction or an excessive reaction.
2. a condition of being allergic to several antigens. adj., adj pather´gic.

path·er·gy

(path'ĕr-jē),
Obsolete term for those reactions resulting from a state of altered activity, both allergic (immune) and nonallergic.
[G. pathos, disease, + ergon, work]

pathergy

/path·er·gy/ (path´er-je)
1. a condition in which the application of a stimulus leaves the organism unduly susceptible to subsequent stimuli of a different kind.
2. a condition of being allergic to numerous antigens.pather´gic

pathergy

Dermatology
The development of a skin lesion similar or identical to the “index lesion” at a site of mechanical trauma—e.g., the development of sterile pustules of traumatised skin in patients with Behçet’s disease.
 
Medspeak, retired
An obsolete nonspecific term for either
(1) An altered immune response to an antigenic challenge, or
(2) The sum of all the reactions arising in or secondary to an altered physiologic "baseline".

path·er·gy

(path'ĕr-jē)
Those reactions resulting from a state of altered activity, both allergic (immune) and nonallergic.
[G. pathos, disease, + ergon, work]

pathergy

The appearance of a papular or pustular lesion around a point on the skin at which a sterile substance was injected 24 to 48 hours before.

pathergy

1. a condition in which the application of a stimulus leaves the organism unduly susceptible to subsequent stimuli of a different kind.
2. a condition of being allergic to several antigens.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Skin lesions were diagnosed in 73% of patients with positive pathergy test in 75%.
The HLA-B51 and pathergy skin test results were negative.
The pathergy phenomenon that may occur with surgical procedures can result in wound enlargement.
In the present case there was no history of use of new creams, toothpaste or cosmetic items around the lips before the problem began more over pathergy test also was negative.
However, the International Study Group for Behcet Disease (ISGB) suggested the diagnostic criteria of oral ulcers in association with any two of the genitalia, eye, and skin involvement or a positive pathergy test to standardize the diagnosis.
Pathergy phenomenon occurs in up to 50% of PG patients, whereby new lesions can be induced at sites of minor skin trauma including venepucture, vaccination and surgical procedures.
The characteristic feature of pyoderma gangrenosum is a pathergy reaction but it is present in about 25% of cases [2].
The association could be explained by the pathergy phenomenon or the increase in G-CSF levels during pregnancy.
Examination of the antecubital fossa revealed pathergy from a blood test and intravenous cannula (FIGURE 3).
All of the study patients had oral ulcers, and most had current or previous genital ulcers and a positive pathergy test (table 2).
On further investigation, genital aphthous ulcerations, positive pathergy test and positive human leukocyte antigen B51 (HLA-B51) serologic typing were detected.