paternalism

(redirected from paternalistic)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Forensics The interacting with a patient as a father would with a child—e.g., surrogate decision-making, which may limit autonomy or be contrary to the patient’s wishes
NIHspeak Making decisions for others against or apart from their wishes with the intent of doing them good
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

paternalism

(pă-tĕr-năl-ĭzm)
A type of medical decision making in which health care professionals exercise unilateral authority over patients. When patients are competent to make their own choices and health care professionals seek to act in the patients' best interests, shared decision making is preferable, because it encourages dialogue, preserves autonomy, fosters responsibility, and allows for adaptation.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Rescuing him, in this situation, is plainly a paternalistic intervention--saving him in disregard of his own desire to end his life.
The three failed antipaternalistic strategies I will now canvass are: (1) the Argument from Relative Paternalistic Ignorance, (2) the Arguments from the Instrumental and Non-Instrumental Value of Choice or Personal Autonomy, and (3) the Argument from Defending Vice as Value.
For now, the spread of paternalistic schooling is taking place on a school-by-school basis in dozens of schools, but not on a massive scale.
It suggests that the effectiveness of paternalistic leadership may be more broad-based than previously thought, and it may be all about how people respond to leaders and not about where they live or the type of work they do," Yammarino said.
Nudges are consistent choice paternalistic when the arguments used to support them are based on presumptions about the preferences of the consistent decision-makers that disregard the actual, observed choices of the people in that group.
Social exchange theory and norms of reciprocity have been used to develop a framework to explain the relationship between direct supervisors' paternalistic leadership behavior and college English teachers' teaching efficacy (Thibaut & Kelley, 1959).
When is paternalism warranted?/After reviewing the academic literature on paternalism, the authors "conclude that a government intervention is paternalistic with respect to an individual if it is intended to address a failure of judgment by that individual [and] further the individual's own good."
This understanding of paternalism's normative significance provides the tools to make the charge of paternalism leveled against some policies intelligible, and conversely to explain why other paternalistic policies are permissible.
In response to the scheduled ban reason co-hosted a "Vape-in" at the Museum of Sex in Manhattan, where participants defied the authority of their paternalistic lawmakers at the stroke of midnight and celebrated the benefits of increasingly popular e-cigarettes, which are now being sold by tobacco companies.
Welfare reform policies in Australia that aim to assist jobless people into employment exhibit paternalistic characteristics.
He said: "Local government in the North East has been paternalistic. We have always wanted to care for people, with the recession we have had and the way things are we now have to help people to do these things for themselves, but to be there to catch people if they do it for themselves.
The nation-state system that took root in the region in the aftermath of World War I enabled the consolidation of paternalistic centralized states, but failed to provide for societal checks and balances.