paternalism

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Related to paternalist: maternalistic
Forensics The interacting with a patient as a father would with a child—e.g., surrogate decision-making, which may limit autonomy or be contrary to the patient’s wishes
NIHspeak Making decisions for others against or apart from their wishes with the intent of doing them good
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

paternalism

(pă-tĕr-năl-ĭzm)
A type of medical decision making in which health care professionals exercise unilateral authority over patients. When patients are competent to make their own choices and health care professionals seek to act in the patients' best interests, shared decision making is preferable, because it encourages dialogue, preserves autonomy, fosters responsibility, and allows for adaptation.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
(94.) See THALER & SUNSTEIN, supra note 1, at 108-09 (describing automatic enrollment as a salutary libertarian paternalist intervention).
(33) Moreover, a question of the survey published in November 2010 about the role of the state within the Romanian society confirmed that respondents highly valued the state interventionism and social protection measures of the paternalist state.
Whether the policies preempt decisionmaking altogether, rig the deck in favor of the paternalist's preferred outcome, or undo the decision after the fact, the edifying decisionmaking feedback loop is broken.
paternalist movement that it has birthed, has undoubtedly influenced the
Conly comments that "the soft paternalist merely imposes what the agent would want if informed." P.
White suggests that the "nudges" advocated by libertarian paternalists require an unjustified presumption that policymakers, armed with data from behavioral economics, have privileged access to people's interests.
paternalist might believe that choosers have the right ends, but that
(753-4) The paternalist world view founded on the preservation of class distinctions and the notion of "reciprocal obligations between classes" (Nash 15) is endorsed in the novel not only by Sam's siding with his master but also by his refusal to side with his fellow "insolent" servants.
They attempted to develop alternatives beyond the repressive choices of the paternalist welfare-capitalist state or the autocratic, Leninist state.
paternalist interference with this impaired class of choices.
paternalist. The wild and childish Irishman thus becomes the empathetic
I wished I could fill it with broken concepts, like violence as a solution to anything and the cheap media spin that sells it, like paternalist politics and religion and the helplessness and resentment they've engendered - everything standing between us and our possibilities, all that is old and useless and deserves to be junked.