paternalism

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Related to paternalist: maternalistic
Forensics The interacting with a patient as a father would with a child—e.g., surrogate decision-making, which may limit autonomy or be contrary to the patient’s wishes
NIHspeak Making decisions for others against or apart from their wishes with the intent of doing them good

paternalism

(pă-tĕr-năl-ĭzm)
A type of medical decision making in which health care professionals exercise unilateral authority over patients. When patients are competent to make their own choices and health care professionals seek to act in the patients' best interests, shared decision making is preferable, because it encourages dialogue, preserves autonomy, fosters responsibility, and allows for adaptation.

paternalism (p·terˑ·nl·izm),

n a conflict between beneficence and auton-omy, such as when a practitioner ignores the choice that a patient makes because he or she feels that more good can be done by the practitioner's judgment. See also beneficence and autonomy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Within that territory, libertarian paternalists say, lies an approach under which planners construct "choice architecture" that steers people toward ends that are best for them (as they themselves would judge were they operating free of cognitive and volitional limitations), while simultaneously protecting people's freedom of choice by allowing them to opt out of specified arrangements should they choose to do so.
Thus, Romanians highly value the former socialist state and especially its paternalist involvement in people's life (as the foremost regulator of the national economy or as the main provider of social welfare for its people) destroyed by the introduction of the market economy.
Traditional paternalists have no trouble simply inserting their own preferences into the regulations, though it's generally unclear why their preferences, applied across a general population, should be considered superior to people's individual choices.
Scholars can analyze the effects of a paternalist modification to
S]ince a libertarian paternalist system allows individuals the ability to act contrary to the nudge, those for whom the default option, and so forth, are not good choices could bypass the nudge to hit upon a choice more appropriate to their own particular case, and thus would benefit from the freedom this system allows.
But when government planners try to nudge us in a preferred direction by exploiting knowledge about our cognitive biases, we do not expect it, so libertarian paternalists will tend to reinforce our biases (p.
because long-term costs are not salient), means paternalists might take
Stevens's positioning of himself as a service provider to those who, unlike an "ordinary" man such as himself (194), know how to manage the "great affairs of the nation", is one example of the paternalist discourse he subscribes to.
considerably diminished when the paternalist only attempts to intervene
quintessential Southern paternalist who will finally be dethroned by the
This history of UN peacekeeping operations in Africa from the 1950s to the present explores the political machinations of the world body and the undercurrents of racism, western exceptionalism, and paternalist first-world policies that have led to a disastrous record for UN Peacekeeping in the region.
After a discussion of the representation of women's work in this period, and the varied reactions to it, there are chapters on the textile workers of Dionne, retail work and union protest in the department store of the paternalist Dupuis Freres, and Aboriginal women's work in prairie communities.