paternalism

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Related to paternalist: maternalistic
Forensics The interacting with a patient as a father would with a child—e.g., surrogate decision-making, which may limit autonomy or be contrary to the patient’s wishes
NIHspeak Making decisions for others against or apart from their wishes with the intent of doing them good

paternalism

(pă-tĕr-năl-ĭzm)
A type of medical decision making in which health care professionals exercise unilateral authority over patients. When patients are competent to make their own choices and health care professionals seek to act in the patients' best interests, shared decision making is preferable, because it encourages dialogue, preserves autonomy, fosters responsibility, and allows for adaptation.

paternalism (p·terˑ·nl·izm),

n a conflict between beneficence and auton-omy, such as when a practitioner ignores the choice that a patient makes because he or she feels that more good can be done by the practitioner's judgment. See also beneficence and autonomy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ends paternalists might forbid people from engaging in certain sexual
Moreover, even for the many modern contractualists who are willing to tolerate paternalist intervention in some circumstances, sorting permissible from impermissible manipulation of consumer cognition is a complex problem that suggests the contractualist approach, even if theoretically sound, might be infeasible in practice.
aristocratic Anglo-Irish paternalist against a rebellious Irish
This is deceptive, rather than coercive, paternalism: the Lotus Sutra never explicitly endorses paternalist uses of physical force, and at one point seems to reject them.
True, managerial strategies in the coal pits, in paternalist housing schemes, and in support of the ethnic life of immigrant personnel earned firms short-term gains by building up and stabilizing the postwar work force.
Lord Justice Rix added: 'While the public interest in a fair and just exercise of the court's discretion remains, there is fairness and justice too in a proper appreciation of party autonomy, and there are dangers in overly paternalist or patronising attitudes or in an insufficiently international outlook.
A libertarian paternalist looks at regulations like OSHA's or EPA's and says, 'These are just too complex, and we're spending too many of our resources on compliance,'" says Jamison Colburn, a professor at Penn State's Dickinson School of Law.
Western concerns--about China turning a blind eye to the genocide in Darfur or its support of Robert Mugabe in Zimbabwe--are merely rooted in the "Western liberal consensus" whose members believe "(often in the most paternalist way) it is their responsibility to look after Africa.
He conveniently ignores the record of limited paternalist legislation (there was some); and, tilting at Annabel Patterson's Shakespeare and the Popular Voice (1989), Arnold lays down that "The people of England were not 'in desperate need of representation': they had it already in the House of Commons .
Ulkemizde KPR'a karar vermede, sonlandirmada, resussitasyon sirasinda aile ile iliskilerde genellikle saglik calisanlari olaylan yonlendirerek paternalist bir yaklasim sergilemektedir.
Unlike the soft paternalist, a hard paternalist may restrain Jones from crossing a dangerous bridge despite the fact that he knows Jones is well-informed of its danger, and voluntarily intends to proceed anyway.
The play unmasks paternalist representation as patriarchal brutality, and, despite the carnage inflicted, the cruel power of the Andronici is unshaken as the heirs seize control.