paternalism


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Related to paternalism: medical paternalism
Forensics The interacting with a patient as a father would with a child—e.g., surrogate decision-making, which may limit autonomy or be contrary to the patient’s wishes
NIHspeak Making decisions for others against or apart from their wishes with the intent of doing them good

paternalism

(pă-tĕr-năl-ĭzm)
A type of medical decision making in which health care professionals exercise unilateral authority over patients. When patients are competent to make their own choices and health care professionals seek to act in the patients' best interests, shared decision making is preferable, because it encourages dialogue, preserves autonomy, fosters responsibility, and allows for adaptation.
References in periodicals archive ?
In both of these cases, the charge of paternalism might depend on a mistaken inference about the actor's intentions.
Perhaps this approach can also be counted as a form of soft paternalism insofar as it is steering people toward active decisions, when people have not actively decided in favor of active decisions!
This is not for the usual reason--i.e., that mandates restrict peopl 's choices; paternalism, as I use the term, is about the assumptions policymakers make about people's choices and preferences when designing policy, not the substance of the policy itself.
The article concludes with a discussion about how the reasons for monitoring users in a news media context are related to both positive and negative aspects of paternalism.
Our concerns about cognitive hazards have only grown since 2006, as governments and other organizations' taste for paternalism has increased.
While Everett's speculative fiction imagines southern literature outside the racial logics of paternalism, his focus on paternalism as a key social relation in understanding southern whiteness is not without precedent.
The tensions and problems that may arise from ordinary beings's use of upaya-kausalya in practical life addressed here are: (1) hubris, (15) (2) paternalism, (3) the projection of needs, wants, or desires, and (4) a failure to help.
In recent years, there have been vigorous debates about freedom of choice, paternalism, behavioral economics, individual autonomy, and the use of defaults.
There are various forms of paternalism: an important distinction is between weak and strong.
Paternalism still denies individual autonomy, White argues, "by blocking or manipulating choice to promote the interest imposed by the paternalist" (p.
Part 3 explores the implications of care-agapism for generosity, benevolent paternalism, and most notably forgiveness; while part 4 offers a rich reading of Pauline justification in Romans as vindicating the justice of God's generosity.
Corner Brook's Townsite was built by Bowater and its predecessors and generated fringe towns that became centres for small businesses and subsistence work; these areas were not company-controlled and lacked basic amenities provided in the town site, but they also allowed some individuals to escape the paternalism of the company Eventually, in the 1950s, the Townsite amalgamated with the fringe areas; in the previous decade, however, Bowater had already begun its retreat from the increasingly expensive support structures created through its paternalism.