paternalism


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Related to paternalism: medical paternalism
Forensics The interacting with a patient as a father would with a child—e.g., surrogate decision-making, which may limit autonomy or be contrary to the patient’s wishes
NIHspeak Making decisions for others against or apart from their wishes with the intent of doing them good

paternalism

(pă-tĕr-năl-ĭzm)
A type of medical decision making in which health care professionals exercise unilateral authority over patients. When patients are competent to make their own choices and health care professionals seek to act in the patients' best interests, shared decision making is preferable, because it encourages dialogue, preserves autonomy, fosters responsibility, and allows for adaptation.

paternalism (p·terˑ·nl·izm),

n a conflict between beneficence and auton-omy, such as when a practitioner ignores the choice that a patient makes because he or she feels that more good can be done by the practitioner's judgment. See also beneficence and autonomy.
References in periodicals archive ?
SOFT PATERNALISM Fuel-economy labels Automatic enrollment in
HARD PATERNALISM Fuel-economy standards Criminal ban on same-sex
Choice-promoting or choice-requiring paternalism might be attractive forms of paternalism, but neither is an oxymoron, and they are paternalistic nonetheless.
If people are required to choose even when they would prefer not to do so, active choosing counts as a species of nonlibertarian paternalism in the sense that people's own choice is being rejected.
Most definitions of paternalism in previous research are focused on the outcome of a paternalistic intervention.
Libertarian paternalism is a program designed to help individuals overcome the cognitive biases that interfere with their ability to realize their own ends.
Brannon Costello, like Johnson, reads racial paternalism in twentieth-century southern literature through the idea of conspicuous consumption, arguing that the rise of "business and urban oriented" economies in the early twentieth century led to white southerners conceiving of "class in terms of a mythical but powerful vision of the Old South aristocracy" <i>(Plantation Airs</i> 4).
This isn't a rhetorical question meant to prompt reconsideration of whether paternalism is wrong.
To better elucidate the problem of paternalism in this context, let us turn to another parable, this time from outside the Buddhist tradition.
If, by contrast, people are asked whether they want to choose, and can opt out of active choosing (in favor of, say, a default rule), active choosing counts as a form of libertarian paternalism.
That is, in ascertaining the objectives and means of workfare and assessing whether the paternalistic characteristics are significant, general exploration of the policy field was conducted, with special attention given to data that might reveal the presence of paternalism.
One of White's most compelling challenges to libertarian paternalism turns on the connection between choice manipulation and the development of character virtues.