paternal


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paternal

(pə-tûr′nəl)
adj.
1. Relating to or characteristic of a father or fatherhood; fatherly.
2. Received or inherited from a father: a paternal trait.
3. Related through one's father: my paternal aunt.

pa·ter′nal·ly adv.

paternal

[pətur′nəl]
Etymology: L, pater, father
pertaining to fatherhood, characteristic of a father, or related through a father.

paternal

(pă-tĕr′năl) [L. paternis, fatherly]
Of, pert. to, or inherited from the father.

Paternal

From one's father.
Mentioned in: Prader-Willi Syndrome
References in periodicals archive ?
This means boys with poor paternal care are more likely to be depressed.
Just as in females, males must inhibit their infanticidal behavior and become paternal before the birth of the pups to avoid hurting their own offspring (Hrdy 1979; Vom Saal & Howard, 1982; Hausfater & Hrdy, 1984; Parmigiani & Vom Saal, 1994).
The aim of the research was to determine paternal ancestry among the Greek Cypriot community in the context of the central and eastern Mediterranean and the near East, and to identify genetic similarities and differences between Greek Cypriots and Turkish Cypriots.
Separately, they investigated whether the effects of paternal age on development were more likely attributable to genetic or environmental factors.
Consanguinity had two attributes; maternal consanguinity and paternal consanguinity.
Other scientists had previously identified a different process, called autophagy, that helps break down paternal mitochondria after fertilization (SN: 1/1/00,p.
The aim of the researchers was to establish whether or not maternal and paternal ages independently increase the risk of ASD and, if so, to what extent.
Unlike the maternal contributor who is born with her eggs, the paternal contributor sperm is created at the point of use.
Paternal age effect is more prominent with point mutation than with deletions as point mutations are almost entirely from sperm, whereas the deletions are derived from both parents.
to more convincingly argue that paternal incarceration has a causal
By this is meant that 'the father', because of his traditional historical role, has been used as an easily understood place-holder for something more abstract, namely the paternal function.
Noting that paternal post natal depression, which many new fathers struggle with following the birth of their child, is often overlooked, Spenser discusses how the condition can lead to emotional withdrawal, substance abuse, abandonment, extra-marital affairs, and even violence.