patent

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Related to patentability: Software patentability

patent

 [pa´tent]
1. open, unobstructed, or not closed.
2. apparent, evident.
patent ductus arteriosus abnormal persistence of an open lumen in the ductus arteriosus, between the aorta and the pulmonary artery, after birth. The ductus arteriosus is open during prenatal life, allowing most of the blood of the fetus to bypass the lungs, but normally this channel closes shortly after birth and changes into a fibrous cord called the ligamentum arteriosum. When it remains open, it places special burdens on the left ventricle, since much of the ventricular output is being shunted from the aorta into the pulmonary artery. The condition may coexist with other congenital malformations.

The symptoms of patent ductus arteriosus are usually so slight that they are not noticed until the child is older and more active. He then begins to experience dyspnea on exertion. If the ductus is large there may be retardation of growth. Pulmonary congestion may result from poor left ventricular function. The heart compensates through hypertrophy and dilation.

Treatment is surgical ligation of the open ductus, preferably when the child is from 4 to 10 years of age. Prognosis, when the condition is not accompanied by other congenital heart defects, is excellent.

The ductus may remain open in as many as 10 per cent of preterm infants, especially those under 1500 grams. If the shunt across the ductus is large, heart failure can occur and surgical repair may be necessary. Investigators into the effects of the prostaglandins have reported that closure of a patent ductus arteriosus can be produced in preterm infants by administration of an inhibitor of prostaglandin formation. Conversely, in neonates suffering from severe complex congenital heart defects in which an open ductus arteriosus could be beneficial, injections of prostaglandins have been used to keep the channel open.
Patent ductus arteriosus. The shunt is from aorta to pulmonary artery. From Betz et al., 1994.

pa·tent

(pā'tĕnt), Avoid the mispronunciation păt'ent.
Open or exposed.
Synonym(s): patulous
[L. patens, pres. p. of pateo, to lie open]

patent

/pat·ent/ (pāt´'nt)
1. open, unobstructed, or not closed.
2. apparent, evident.

patent

(păt′nt)
adj.
1. Relating to or being a nonprescription drug or other medical preparation that is often protected by a trademark.
2. (pāt′nt) Not blocked; open.
3. (pāt′nt) Spreading open; expanded.

patent

(păt′nt)
n.
a. A grant made by a government that confers upon the creator of an invention the sole right to make, use, and sell that invention for a set period of time.
b. Letters patent.
c. An invention protected by such a grant.
adj.
1.
a. Protected or conferred by a patent or letters patent: a patent right.
b. Of, relating to, or dealing in patents: patent law.
2. (pāt′nt) Biology
a. Not blocked; open: a patent duct.
b. Spreading open; expanded: patent sepals.
3. Relating to or being a nonprescription drug or other medical preparation that is protected by a trademark.

pat′ent·a·bil′i·ty n.
pat′ent·a·ble adj.

patent

[pā′tənt]
Etymology: L, patens, open
open and unblocked, such as a patent airway or a patent anus.

patent

Medspeak
adjective Open, not occluded; unobstructed; referring to a duct, lumen or vessel.
 
Science-speak
noun A document that grants an inventor, in terms of a determined number of years, the exclusive right to make use of and sell his or her invention.

patent

adjective pronounced, pay-tent Open, unobstructed, referring to a duct, lumen, or vessel noun pronounced, pah-tent A document that grants an inventor in terms of a determined number of years, the exclusive right to make use of and sell his invention

pa·tent

(pā'tĕnt)
Open or exposed.
Synonym(s): patulous.
[L. patens, pres. p. of pateo, to lie open]

patent

1. Open or unobstructed.
2. A term still sometimes applied to proprietary medication, as in patent medicine. From Latin patent , open.

pa·tent

(pā'tĕnt)
Open or exposed.
[L. patens, pres. p. of pateo, to lie open]

patent

1. open, unobstructed, or not closed.
2. apparent, evident.

patent ductus arteriosus (PDA)
abnormal persistence of an open lumen in the ductus arteriosus, between the aorta and the pulmonary artery, after birth. The ductus arteriosus is open during prenatal life, allowing most of the blood of the fetus to bypass the lungs, but normally this channel closes shortly before birth. When the ductus arteriosus remains open, it places special burdens on the left ventricle and causes a diminished blood flow in the aorta. May remain open for up to 5 days in foals. One of the most common congenital heart defects in dogs, but less common in cats. Causes a continuous 'machinery' murmur loud in systole, soft in diastole, and 'bounding' pulse.
patent ductus venosus
see ductus venosus.
patent foramen ovale
see foramen ovale (1).
patent medicine
a drug or remedy protected by a trademark, available without a prescription.
patent period
the period during a disease in which the causative agent can be detected by clinicopathological tests, e.g. for helminth eggs.
patent urachus
the urachus persists after birth and allows urine to drip out of the bladder through the umbilicus. See also urachus.
patent ventricular septum
includes several entities characterized by incomplete closure of ventricular wall. Characterized by palpable cardiac thrill and audible pansystolic murmur on both sides of the chest at birth, accompanied by exercise intolerance and developing dyspnea at rest.

Patient discussion about patent

Q. How open are you about telling people that you are bipolar? I am studying in a coed college and am high scoring and talented. Actually I am a guitarist who entertains most of my peers. So I have lots of friends. For the past 8 months I could not use my guitar because of my busy study schedule. Without music I feel very depressed. My attitude has changed. My friends started deserting me because of my depression. So I started hating life and checked with a psychiatrist who diagnosed as bipolar. I fear whether I will lose my friends. So this question is to bipolar people: How open are you about telling people that you are bipolar?

A. P.S..we all have problems,god made us all different,acept who you are,and you will be alright.

Q. what are the do and don't do of Allergic people when they go out side to the open land?

A. if seasonal allergy is what you mean -there are certain times a year that you know you get sick. try avoiding long walks in fields of blooming flowers at those times...take antihistamine with you all the time, and don't forget some tissue paper :)

Q. what is the best thing to do to eliminate or to let it be remove without surgery?I'm afraid but laser mayb ok If I can go for laser where can you suggest coz I'm jobless and can't afford to pay.Or is there some remedy that i can take to melt those stones inside my bladder then they can come out through my waste ?

A. Bladder stones, also called bladder calculi, often form when concentrated urine sits in your bladder. Bladder stones usually need to be removed. If the stone is small, your doctor may recommend that you drink an increased amount of water each day to help the stone pass. If the stone is large or doesn't pass on its own, your doctor may need to remove the stone. Bladder stones are usually removed during a procedure called a cystolitholapaxy. This is done by inserting a small tube with a camera at the end (cystoscope) through your urethra and into your bladder to view the stone. Your doctor uses a laser, ultrasound or mechanical device to break the stone into small pieces and then flushes the pieces from your bladder.
I am not familiar with the cost of such procedure.

More discussions about patent
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