patellofemoral pain syndrome


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patellofemoral pain syndrome

Sports medicine An often bilateral condition of insidious onset seen in young ♀ athletes Clinical Diffuse knee pain exacerbated by stair descent, squatting and prolonged sitting, patellar crepitus, knee joint stiffness, ↓ ROM. See Moviegoer sign.

patellofemoral pain syndrome

Pain in the knee that occurs with exertion (e.g., walking upstairs) and is associated with stiffness after prolonged sitting and tenderness when the patella is compressed on the femoral condyle or when it is moved laterally.
See: patellofemoral instability
References in periodicals archive ?
The Q-angle is widely used as an indicator of patellofemoral problems such as patellofemoral pain syndrome.
Patellar taping for patellofemoral pain syndrome in adults.
Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS): a systematic review of anatomy and potential risk factors.
EMG analysis of vastus medialis obliquus/vastus lateralis activities in subjects with patellofemoral pain syndrome before and after a home exercise program.
The aim of this study was to determine the effect of hip Abductor and External Rotator muscle strengthening exercises on the pain in males with Patellofemoral pain syndrome.
Patellofemoral pain syndrome in athletes: a 5-7-year retrospective follow-up study of 250 athletes.
Therapeutic patellar taping changes the timing of vasti muscle activation in people with patellofemoral pain syndrome.
2008) Patellar taping, patellofemoral pain syndrome, lower extremity kinematics, and dynamic postural control.
Development of a clinical prediction rule for classifying patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome who respond to patellar taping.
Patellofemoral joint kinematics in individuals with and without patellofemoral pain syndrome.
Washington, November 24 (ANI): Researchers have found what causes "runner's knee" or patellofemoral pain syndrome among athletes.
Patellofemoral pain syndrome is a common orthopaedic complaint frequently seen in physiotherapy practice.