patella

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pa·tel·la

, gen. and pl.

pa·tel·lae

(pa-tel'ă, -ē), [TA]
The large sesamoid bone, in the combined tendon of the quadriceps femoris, covering the anterior surface of the knee.
Synonym(s): kneecap
[L. a small plate, the kneecap, dim. of patina, a shallow disk, fr. pateo, to lie open]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

patella

(pə-tĕl′ə)
n. pl. pa·tellae (-tĕl′ē)
1.
a. A flat triangular bone located at the front of the knee joint. Also called kneecap.
b. A dish-shaped anatomical formation.
2. A pan or dish in ancient Rome.

pa·tel′lar, pa·tel′late (-tĕl′ĭt, -āt′) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

pa·tel·la

, pl. patellae (pă-tel'ă, -ē) [TA]
The large sesamoid bone that covers the anterior surface of the knee. It is formed in the tendon of the quadriceps femoris muscle and is attached to the tibia by the patellar tendon.
Synonym(s): kneecap.
[L. a small plate, the kneecap, dim. of patina, a shallow disk, fr. pateo, to lie open]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

patella

The knee cap. The patella is a large triangular SESAMOID bone lying on front of the knee joint within the tendon of the QUADRICEPS FEMORIS group of muscles.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

patella

  1. the kneecap bone which is present in most mammals, and in some birds and reptiles, protecting the front of the joint from injury.
  2. the generic name of the LIMPET, Patella.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Patella

The kneecap.
Mentioned in: Nail-Patella Syndrome
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The accepted indications for surgery in the acute setting are osteochondral fragments, persistent patellar subluxation and detachment of the VMO and medial retinaculum from the medial aspect of the patella. The surgery may be directed toward the above problem, and does not necessarily include realignment surgery.
These again include an increased Q angle (increased femoral anteversion, genu valgum, tibia vara isolated to the proximal tibia, or external tibial torsion), MPFL insufficiency, patella alta, or patellofemoral dysplasia.
This medial imbrication procedure re-tensions the medial soft tissue restraints and restores a medially-directed force to the patella. (48,49) Many surgeons still utilize this simple procedure, believing that the MPFL scars down and can be re-tensioned with distalization and medialization along with the VMO.
(52) Fixation techniques at both the femur and the patella vary considerably, though the goal is the same: secure fixation of the graft to the appropriate location on both the femur and the patella.
They also should be performed with caution in patients with medial facet arthrosis on the patella. The different procedures differ with respect to the obliquity of the osteotomy.
Chondrosis of the medial facet of the patella is a contraindication to medialization procedures of the tibial tubercle.
An electromyographic investigation of subluxation of the patella. J Bone Joint Surg Br.
Acute dislocation of the patella. A correlative pathoanatomic study.
Patella alta and recurrent dislocation of the patella.
Lateral release of the patella: indications and contraindications.
Operative versus closed treatment of primary dislocation of the patella. Similar 2-year results in 125 randomized patients.
Acute dislocation of the patella: results of conservative treatment.

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