patch test


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patch

 [pach]
a small area differing from the rest of a surface.
Peyer's p's whitish, oval, elevated patches of closely packed lymph follicles in mucous and submucous layers of the small intestine.
salmon patch a salmon-colored nevus flammeus usually found over the eyelids, between the eyes, or on the forehead. It is the most common vascular lesion of infancy, found in 40 per cent of newborns, and usually fades in the first year of life. Called also nevus simplex.
patch test a type of skin test for hypersensitivity in which filter paper or gauze saturated with the substance in question is applied to the skin, usually on the forearm; a positive reaction is reddening or swelling at the site.
Patch test.

patch test

a test of skin sensitiveness: a small piece of paper, tape, or a cup, wet with nonirritating diluted test fluid, is applied to skin of the upper back or upper outer arm and after 48 hours the covered is compared with the uncovered surface; an erythematous reaction with vesicles occurs if the substance causes contact allergy.
See also: photo-patch test.

patch test

n.
A test for allergic sensitivity in which a suspected allergen is applied to the skin on a small surgical pad.

patch test

a skin test for identifying allergens, especially those causing contact dermatitis. The suspected substance (food, pollen, animal fur) is applied to an adhesive patch that is placed on the patient's skin. Another patch, with nothing on it, serves as a control. After a certain period (usually 24 to 48 hours) both patches are removed. If the skin under the suspect patch is red and swollen and the skin under the control area is not, the test result is said to be positive, and the person is probably allergic to that substance. Compare radioallergosorbent test.
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Removing patch tests

patch test

Allergy skin test, contact dermatitis skin test, patch skin test Immunology An epicutaneous test of contact-type–delayed hypersensitivity, which consists of applying a patch with a low dose of an allergen–antigen to an unexposed area of the skin, usually the back, and observing the site 1-2 days later; the most common sensitizing haptens in North America are poison ivy–Toxicodendron radicans, nickel, chromate, paraphenylenediamine–a dye constituent, ethylenediamine–a solvent and emulsifier, local anesthetics–eg, benzocaine, rubber, neomycin, and others; PT materials have been standardized and are available commercially, either as individual allergens, or as batteries of allergens, including those for specific occupations–eg, hairdressers, printers, and others; incorrect PT results are common in the form of false-positives, due to too high concentration of allergens in the patches, misinterpretation of irritant reactions, and generalized erythema of the skin testing site; false-negative results are linked to technical errors and failure to simulate the 'real-world' situation in which the person is exposed to the allergen

patch test

(pach test)
A test of skin sensitiveness: a small piece of paper, tape, or a cup, wet with a dilute solution or suspension of test material, is applied to skin of the upper back or upper outer arm, and after 48 hours the area previously covered is compared with the uncovered surface; an erythematous reaction with vesicles occurs if the substance causes contact allergy.
See also: photo-patch test

patch test

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APPLYING PATCH TEST
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APPLYING PATCH TEST
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APPLYING PATCH TEST
A skin test in which a low concentration of a presumed allergen is applied to the skin beneath an occlusive dressing. The test is the primary method used to determine the presence of allergic contact dermatitis. If the concentration of the agent is too high or an allergy exists to the material used in the dressing, false-positive reactions can occur as a result of local irritation. False-negative reactions may result if the concentration of the suspected allergen is too low, or if the duration of the test is too short. Commercially available, standardized kits to facilitate patch testing include the T.R.U.E. test and Finn Chambers. See: illustration; skin test
illustration

Patch test

A skin test that is done to identify allergens. A suspected substance is applied to the skin. After 24-48 hours, if the area is red and swollen, the test is positive for that substance. If no reaction occurs, another substance is applied. This is continued until the patient experiences an allergic reaction where the irritant was applied to the skin.
Mentioned in: Dermatitis, Skin Lesions

patch test

(pach test)
A test of skin sensitivity; a small piece of paper, tape, or a cup, wet with a dilute solution or suspension of test material, is applied to skin of the upper back or upper outer arm, and after 48 hours the area previously covered is compared with the uncovered surface; an erythematous reaction with vesicles occurs if the substance causes contact allergy.

patch

a small area differing from the rest of a surface.

patch grafting
see patch graft.
serosal patch
creation of an adhesion between serosal surfaces in order to cover a defect or perforation of bowel, often accomplished by suturing another section of bowel over the area.
patch test
a test of delayed type hypersensitivity in the skin used in the diagnosis of allergic contact dermatitis. The substance suspected of being the cause is applied to the skin, either under a dressing (closed patch test) or without a covering (open patch test). The site is examined at regular intervals for up to 5 days to detect any inflammatory reaction of the skin.
References in periodicals archive ?
While not perfect, teledermatology does have promise for reading patch test reactions, she added.
The patch test results with the Indian standard series of antigens were positive in 58% of our study patients, which is close to the reported sensitivity of the Indian standard series in 1000 ACD cases by A.
Table 3 Correlation of positive patch test results with occupation
It was found in this research that reasonably accurate MPD can be obtained by laser scanning within 60 seconds, which is typically less than the time required for conducting a sand patch test.
Evaluation of variables influencing the outcome of the atopy patch test.
Forty-four percent (26 patients) of the patients had at least one positive patch test.
An initial 4x4 nodal distribution is used in each patch test and the EK error indicator limit is chosen to be 0.
First and foremost, a visit to the new L'Oreal Colour Bar to discuss shades and techniques and then a patch test for sensitivity.
Skin patch tests use the patient's glove or latex product to screen for an immediate or delayed hypersensitivity and to evaluate the cause of the skin irritation Use of the latex product in question helps to ensure an accurate diagnosis since no standardized patch test exists.
Although not widely considered to be a safe diagnostic procedure, several studies have evaluated elicitation of the cutaneous beryllium DTH response in beryllium-sensitized and CBD patients using the skin patch test (Bobka et al.