patch


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patch

 [pach]
a small area differing from the rest of a surface.
Peyer's p's whitish, oval, elevated patches of closely packed lymph follicles in mucous and submucous layers of the small intestine.
salmon patch a salmon-colored nevus flammeus usually found over the eyelids, between the eyes, or on the forehead. It is the most common vascular lesion of infancy, found in 40 per cent of newborns, and usually fades in the first year of life. Called also nevus simplex.
patch test a type of skin test for hypersensitivity in which filter paper or gauze saturated with the substance in question is applied to the skin, usually on the forearm; a positive reaction is reddening or swelling at the site.
Patch test.

patch

(patch),
1. A small circumscribed area differing in color or structure from the surrounding surface.
2. In dermatology, a flat area larger than 1 cm in diameter.
3. An intermediate stage in the formation of a cap on the surface of a cell.

patch

(pach)
1. a small area differing from the rest of a surface.
2. a macule more than 3 or 4 cm in diameter.

Peyer's patches  oval elevated patches of closely packed lymph follicles on the mucosa of the small intestines.
salmon patch  see nevus flammeus.

patch

(păch)
n.
1. A small circumscribed area differing from the surrounding surface.
2. A dressing or covering applied to protect a wound or sore.
3. A transdermal patch.

patch

Etymology: ME, pacche
a small spot of surface tissue that differs from the surrounding area in color or texture or both and is not elevated above it.

patch

Informatics An occasionally inelegant software or hardware “workaround” to solve a problem in data flow in an information system Therapeutics A delivery system in which an agent of interest–eg, nicotine, testosterone is impregnated in a disposable material and placed on the skin for passive absorption. See Lidocaine patch, Nicotine patch, St. John's® transdermal patch, RapiSeal patch Vox populi A gob or wad of a thing. See Cotton-ball patch, Cotton wool patch, Herald patch, Inlet patch, Leaky patch, Peyer's patch, Shagreen patch.

patch

(pach)
1. A small, circumscribed area differing in color or structure from the surrounding surface.
2. dermatology A flat area larger than 1.0 cm in diameter.
3. An intermediate stage in the formation of a cap on the surface of a cell.

brood spot

or

patch

a prolactin-induced (see LUTEOTROPHIC HORMONE bare layer of skin in birds from which feathers are virtually absent and which receives a rich blood supply. Such patches are used to incubate the eggs.

patch,

n a method of medicinal pre-paration in which a cloth dressing is impregnated with herbal constituents and placed on the skin. Particularly used in moxibustion in Chinese medicine.

patch

(pach)
1. A small circumscribed area differing in color or structure from the surrounding surface.
2. In dermatology, a flat area larger than 1 cm in diameter.

patch (pach),

n mucus, a large gray-white region overlying an area of ulceration and occurring on the oral mucosa as an expression of secondary syphilis; highly infectious. See also syphilis.

patch

a small area differing from the rest of a surface.

patch grafting
see patch graft.
serosal patch
creation of an adhesion between serosal surfaces in order to cover a defect or perforation of bowel, often accomplished by suturing another section of bowel over the area.
patch test
a test of delayed type hypersensitivity in the skin used in the diagnosis of allergic contact dermatitis. The substance suspected of being the cause is applied to the skin, either under a dressing (closed patch test) or without a covering (open patch test). The site is examined at regular intervals for up to 5 days to detect any inflammatory reaction of the skin.

Patient discussion about patch

Q. nicotine patch does anyone know if you can use the patch for smokeless tobacco users,that dont smoke,and how well does it work,what are the side effects,i"ve been using smokeless tobacco for 24 years and would like to stop,tried going cold turkey,but it didnt work,my dr. said i should try the patch,but couldnt tell me if it would work or not.

A. There is really no reason you couldn't try the patch. The problem would be with what dose to start. Usually if people smoke more than 10 cigarettes a day they start with the 21mg but I am not sure how smokeless tobacco relates to cigarettes. Your best bet may be to try the gum as you chew it and then place it between you cheek and gum for a while, similar to dip.

More discussions about patch
References in classic literature ?
I threw myself down on the grass and panted till my breath came back; then I went and hid in a patch of reeds down by a swamp.
When they were safe under the veranda, panting, laughing, grumbling, or congratulating themselves on having been so close to a place of shelter, Miss Wilson observed, with some uneasiness, a spade--new, like the hasp of the gate--sticking upright in a patch of ground that someone had evidently been digging lately.
I was right, as appeared later; but in the meantime, the house being stifling hot and the little patch of sand inside the palisade ablaze with midday sun, I began to get another thought into my head, which was not by any means so right.
Vane, taking up a tawdry theatrical dress, with a sigh, and beginning to patch it.
So Chin-chin and Suck-suck went away in a wheel-barrow, and Stumpy, Yock-yock and Cross- patch rode away in a cart.
Before me was a small patch of moonlit sky which showed through a ragged aperture.
In the direction away from the pit I saw, beyond a red-covered wall, a patch of garden ground un- buried.
But then he had but one--at least the place where the other ought to be, was covered by an enormous patch of green silk.
As we were sitting there I saw Umbopa get up and hobble towards the patch of green, and a few minutes afterwards, to my great astonishment, I perceived that usually very dignified individual dancing and shouting like a maniac, and waving something green.
Two others were yeomen of merry Yorkshire, another was a tall stranger in blue, who said he came from London Town, and the last was a tattered stranger in scarlet, who wore a patch over one eye.
They put me to work cultivating in a patch of melons.
His back was gray with a huge patch of yellow on one side and a black patch on the other.