pastoral

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pastoral

emanating from or pertaining to the use of land for pasture.

pastoral rearing
raising of young, after weaning, on pasture where they are more susceptible to nutritional deficiencies and parasitic infestation than young reared indoors.
References in periodicals archive ?
One of the greatest difficulties in addressing and resolving issues surrounding pastoralism is the politicisation of legal regimes and the blockages to the enactment of or implementation of laws that can redress the key challenges posed.
It is estimated that about 50 million people rely on pastoralism for a major part of their livelihood in Sub-Saharan Africa, with around half of them located in the Sahel and the Saharan fringes, and 70 per cent classified as poor by the World Bank.
That means the centuries-old practice of pastoralism will likely remain vulnerable so long as the government's policies stay the same and chronic issues like population growth and overgrazing continue to degrade resources that nomadic herders need to thrive.
As this phase of pastoralism collapsed from the 1930s, the cultural dualism that Dutton had mastered as a droving Aborigine was rendered meaningless.
While this narrative focuses on a period of about thirty years from the late-1970s through the end of the first decade of the twenty-first century, its introduction reaches back to the origins of pastoralism.
Given the climate changes that have taken place, and the predictions for arid regions, this study aimed to identify the impact of adverse climatic conditions on the wellbeing of individuals reliant on pastoralism or pastoralism-associated industries for their income.
Moreover, their genetic analysis revealed strong evidence of recent positive selection affecting several variants associated with this trait in African populations, most likely in response to the cultural development of pastoralism.
With over 65 percent of the population relying on pastoralism to earn a living, the huge livestock deaths could have long-term negative consequences.
Policymakers often view nomadic pastoralism as an archaic and unproductive way of life, with little economic benefit.
In arid and semi-arid areas, pastoralism has an important logic and science, based on indigenous knowledge developed, tested, and applied over time.
The latter follow the main themes of the book and are illustrative of its focus: "Experimentation and regulation, pastoralism and mining, 1850 to 1890" (chapter 2), "Federation, engineering, and a 'watershed' perspective, 1890 to 1956" (chapter 4), and "Challenging national development: dams and irrigation, 1956-1990" (chapter 6).
Currently, pastoralism is practiced worldwide by an estimated 200 million people spread across Africa,the Middle East, Europe, South and Central Asia, South America, and elsewhere.