passivism


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pas·siv·ism

(pas'iv-izm),
1. An attitude of submission.
See also: pathic.
2. A sexual practice in which the subject is submissive to the will of the partner in behavior that usually requires the consent of both participants (for example, anal intercourse).
See also: pathic.
[see passive]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

pas·siv·ism

(pas'iv-izm)
An attitude of submission, particularly in sexual relations.
See also: passive
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

passivism

(păs′ĭ-vĭzm) [″ + Gr. -ismos, condition]
1. Passive behavior or character.
2. Sexual perversion with subjugation of the will to another.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

Patient discussion about passivism

Q. what is a passive smoking? and is it dangerous as an active?

A. Passive smoking is the exposure to cigarettes smoke emitted from cigarettes smoke by other person. It's dangerous and may increase the risk to several diseases similar to active smoking (one's exposure to smoke emitted from the cigarettes he or she is smoking) although the risk is of lower magnitude. Example for passive smoking is children of smokers etc.

You may read more here:http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/secondhandsmoke.html

Q. what is it a passive smoking? and is it bad as as the active smoking? can i get cancer from it?

A. Passive smoking is the involuntary exposure of nonsmokers to tobacco smoke from the smoking of others. It is considered dangerous, and cause increased risk of cancer, although to a lesser degree than active smoking.

You may read more here:
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/secondhandsmoke.html

Q. Can I get lung cancer from passive smoking? All my friends smoke, can I get cancer by hanging out with them?

A. Yes, you can develop cancer by passive smoking. From what I've heard, non-smokers exposed to second-hand smoke at home or work, increase their risk of developing lung cancer by 20 percent to 30 percent.

More discussions about passivism
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References in periodicals archive ?
On the other hand, the emerging perception of US passivism itself creates a relevant situation.
Various features of Millais' treatment of Ophelia's death, be it her flawless garments, or "her inertia and passivism as if she had been turned into another plant in the scene" (Mesa-Villar 2004: 228), remained an inspiration for contemporary models posing for photographs in necroOphelian style.
After the Cold War, a short period of time was described in scientific literature as: unipolar passivism which is a hegemonic system's unwillingness to control the remotest system areas and engage into full dominance.
Nostalgia, through its selective memory of the past, through its escapism, passivism and fatalistic facade, becomes an alternative in this context, generating, in turn, disappointment expressed in low levels of electoral turnout, disinterest in and a passive stance concerning the public (i.e.
The Stoics do not advocate passivism, believing that one remains indifferent to the world if and only if one cannot change it.
At the same time, by maintaining that this primary causality simultaneously guarantees the integrity of creaturely secondary causes, he can avoid a radical passivism that would present the individual as a mere vessel for spiritual experience (Erleben) or feelings.
The AK Party, unlike its passivism in the Semdinli case, actively prevented the HSYK from doing so.
In this community we observe how pacifism - the pursuit of peace, degrades to passivism - state of being passive.
Noddings also examines the positive role of religion by offering a brief review of passivism but also notes that to believe Ghandi's satyagraha would succeed against the Nazis is unrealistic.
* decisive managerial power in American corporations, coupled with shareholder passivism;
The system of political jurisprudence is preferred because it encourages judicial activism and creative dynamism in the justice delivery process, which is why it is more responsive to the needs of society than that of mechanical jurisprudence, which encourages judicial passivism and self-restraint.
Both the policy and the courts are comfortable; instead of choosing an active litigation, judicial activism, they choose passive justice, judicial passivism, position, stressing that this issue should be regulated by the legislature, politics, and politicians.