passive

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pas·sive

(pas'iv),
Not active; submissive.
[L. passivus, fr. patior, to endure]

passive

/pas·sive/ (pas´iv) neither spontaneous nor active; not produced by active efforts.

passive

(păs′ĭv)
adj.
1. Accepting or submitting without resistance or objection.
2. Of or being an inactive or submissive role in a relationship, especially a sexual relationship.

pas′sive·ly adv.
pas·siv′i·ty n.

passive

Etymology: L passivus
pertaining to behavior that subordinates the individual's own interests to the demands of others.

pas·sive

(pas'iv)
Not active; submissive.
[L. passivus, fr. patior, to endure]

passive,

adj pertaining to patients who become mere spectators as they lack the energy or interest to participate.
Enlarge picture
Passion flower.

pas·sive

(pas'iv)
Not active; submissive.
[L. passivus, fr. patior, to endure]

passive,

n in orthodontics, an orthodontic appliance that has been adjusted to apply no effective tooth-moving force to the teeth. Also called
self-ligation, or
“frictionless.”
passive diffusion,
n an absorption process that occurs in the body when carbohydrates are more highly concentrated in the intestine than in the blood.
passive immunity,
n a form of acquired immunity resulting from antibodies that are transmitted naturally through the placenta to a fetus or through the colostrum to an infant or artificially by injection of antiserum for treatment or prophylaxis. Passive immunity is not permanent and does not last as long as active immunity.
passive reciprocation,
passive smoking,
n the inhalation by nonsmokers of the smoke from other people's cigarettes, pipes, and cigars. See also environmental tobacco smoke (ETS/passive smoke).

passive

neither spontaneous on the part of the patient, nor active response by the patient, the stimulus having been applied externally.

passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) test
see passive cutaneous anaphylaxis.
passive diffusion
passage of electrolytes to all parts of a solution, including through a permeable membrane. Plays some part in intestinal absorption.
passive hemagglutination test
passive immunization
see passive immunization.
passive neonatal immunity
see passive immunity.
passive transfer
see passive diffusion (above).
passive venous congestion
noninflammatory distention of vessels with blood. Caused by simple accumulation resulting from obstruction or failure of the heart to eject the full volume of blood returned to it.

Patient discussion about passive

Q. what is a passive smoking? and is it dangerous as an active?

A. Passive smoking is the exposure to cigarettes smoke emitted from cigarettes smoke by other person. It's dangerous and may increase the risk to several diseases similar to active smoking (one's exposure to smoke emitted from the cigarettes he or she is smoking) although the risk is of lower magnitude. Example for passive smoking is children of smokers etc.

You may read more here:http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/secondhandsmoke.html

Q. what is it a passive smoking? and is it bad as as the active smoking? can i get cancer from it?

A. Passive smoking is the involuntary exposure of nonsmokers to tobacco smoke from the smoking of others. It is considered dangerous, and cause increased risk of cancer, although to a lesser degree than active smoking.

You may read more here:
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/secondhandsmoke.html

Q. Can I get lung cancer from passive smoking? All my friends smoke, can I get cancer by hanging out with them?

A. Yes, you can develop cancer by passive smoking. From what I've heard, non-smokers exposed to second-hand smoke at home or work, increase their risk of developing lung cancer by 20 percent to 30 percent.

More discussions about passive
References in periodicals archive ?
Offset that with a paucity of goals, a tendency to react rather than seize the initiative and dominate for 90 minutes, as well as a passiveness when the opposition are up and at 'em.
In the writing center, that passiveness may be modified; for Gamache, the tutor needs to "value free and critical thought rather than uncritical acceptance, and I encourage active involvement in learning rather than passive compliance" (4).
But the passiveness that seems to constitute the virtue of appearings makes them useless in solving the problem of justification.
This promotes passiveness and encourages members to disengage.
Since fall brings a change in white-tail deer behavior, when the passiveness of spring and summer are replaced with the frenzy of the breeding season, it appeared we may be dealing with suicidal deer at our forward-operating base; I didn't want to assist in their quest.
As Hammond, the boyfriend converted from passiveness to zealotry, Michael Anderson Brown has an awkward honesty, and Hillis contributes a few light moments as Annie's friend.
The volunteers' passiveness was key to the sculptural forms--and to the curiosity of the rest of us.
Nor does it lead to political passiveness in the face of oppression.
For example, churches since time immemorial, have justified, condoned and even encouraged women's subordination/subjugation, submissiveness and passiveness.
References to hunkering down, caution, passiveness, hesitance, and a sense of futility resound throughout the descriptions of the careerists' responses.
Yesterday, as the chief executive prepared to attend the draw for the 2004 European Championship qualifiers, he spoke with the passion of a punter rather than the passiveness of a pen-pusher.
Much more characteristic in his work is a kind of simplicity with an undertone of anguish born of an attitude of passiveness, especially in his earlier verse.