passive smoking


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passive smoking

the inhalation by nonsmokers of the smoke from other people's cigarettes, pipes, or cigars. The amount of such smoke inhaled by a nonsmoker is small compared with that inhaled by tobacco users. However, passive smoking can aggravate respiratory illnesses and contribute to serious diseases, including cancer. Infants, fetuses, and individuals with chronic heart and lung diseases or allergies to tobacco can be adversely affected by passive smoking. See also secondhand smoke.

passive smoking

A general term for involuntary inhalation of cigarette smoke by nonsmokers, who breathe ambient air containing carcinogens inhaled by an “active” smoker. Passive smoking causes an estimated 2500–8400 excess annual cases of smoking-related malignancy (US). “Mainstream” smoke is directly inhaled by the smoker; “sidestream” environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) is produced by the smoker but absorbed more readily by nonsmokers, who do not have the benefit of a fiiter. Physical space separation allows significant reduction in exposure to ETS or by nonsmokers.

Passive smokers are exposed to dimethylnitrosamine (a potent carcinogen), benzo(a)pyrene, carbon monoxide (CO), acrolein, arsenic, benzene, cyanide, formaldehyde, nitrosamines, radionuclides and others. Levels of nicotine in passive smoke in unventilated areas may exceed industrial threshold limit levels (> 500 pg/mm3); air zones with CO levels of > 30 ppm cause a passive smoker to have CO blood levels equivalent to having smoked approximatly five cigarettes; prolonged exposure to 30 ppm CO may cause carboxyhaemoglobin levels sufficient to impair visual discrimination and cause psychomotor impairment.

passive smoking

Public health Involuntary 'smoking' by non-smokers who breathe ambient air containing carcinogenic inhalants from an 'active' cigarette smoker; PS ↑ platelet activity, accelerates ASHD, ↑ tissue damage in ischemia or acute MI; PS ↓ both cardiac delivery of O2 to the heart and myocardial ability to use O2 to produce ATP, resulting in ↓ exercise capacity in passive smokers, and ↑ risk of fatal and nonfatal cardiac events; exposure to 3 hrs/day of PS is associated with an ↑ in cervical CA; in children, neonates, and fetuses, PS is linked to ↓ pulmonary function, bronchitis, pneumonia, otitis media and middle ear effusions, asthma, lower birth and adult weight and height, SIDS, poor lung–and physical development, and ↑ perinatal mortality–due to placental vascular disease–eg, placenta previa and abruptio placentae, breast CA; ♀ exposed to PS before age 12 had an odds ratio of 4.5; such children are more likely to become smokers and are at ↑ risk for developing CA in a dose-related manner, in all sites 50% higher than expected, and up to two-fold ↑ in NHL, ALL, and Wilms' tumors; PS by children with cystic fibrosis adversely affects growth and health, resulting in ↑ hospital admissions and poor performance in pulmonary function tests. See Conicotine, Environmental tobacco smoke.

passive smoking

Inhaling cigarette smoke exhaled by others. It has been shown that the rate of lung cancer in non-smokers rises significantly if they are regularly exposed to other people's cigarette smoke. At least 10 separate studies have shown an increase of up to 30% in the risk of lung cancer among non-smokers living with smokers, compared with non-smokers living with non-smokers.

Patient discussion about passive smoking

Q. what is a passive smoking? and is it dangerous as an active?

A. Passive smoking is the exposure to cigarettes smoke emitted from cigarettes smoke by other person. It's dangerous and may increase the risk to several diseases similar to active smoking (one's exposure to smoke emitted from the cigarettes he or she is smoking) although the risk is of lower magnitude. Example for passive smoking is children of smokers etc.

You may read more here:http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/secondhandsmoke.html

Q. Can I get lung cancer from passive smoking? All my friends smoke, can I get cancer by hanging out with them?

A. Yes, you can develop cancer by passive smoking. From what I've heard, non-smokers exposed to second-hand smoke at home or work, increase their risk of developing lung cancer by 20 percent to 30 percent.

Q. what is it a passive smoking? and is it bad as as the active smoking? can i get cancer from it?

A. Passive smoking is the involuntary exposure of nonsmokers to tobacco smoke from the smoking of others. It is considered dangerous, and cause increased risk of cancer, although to a lesser degree than active smoking.

You may read more here:
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/secondhandsmoke.html

More discussions about passive smoking
References in periodicals archive ?
That there was no significant difference between passive smoking exposures and non-exposed participants regarding pregnancy number, delivery number and abortion number.
However, the study says, more research is needed on the link between breast cancer and passive smoking because the current analysis was restricted to the most extensive passive smoking category.
Julie Morgan, Cardiff North MP, who is attempting to get a Private Member's Bill through Parliament to ban smoking in public places in Wales, said, 'I feel very strongly that these figures show the absolute danger of passive smoking and I don't think anyone can now argue against that.
George's Hospital Medical School, London, and his associates conducted what they described as the first prospective study to examine the link between CHD prevalence and passive smoking exposure based on serum cotinine measurements.
The vet thought it might be aerosols or perfume, but he eliminated all those and said the problem was passive smoking.
A study of children exposed to passive smoking, conducted at the University of Medicine of New Jersey in New Brunswick, New Jersey, indicated that high levels of free radicals in tobacco smoke are believed to be responsible for decreased levels of vitamin C in smokers and children who are subjected to passive smoke in their homes.
There has long been controversy about the associations between passive smoking and adverse health outcomes.
A BARMAID suffering from lung cancer plans to sue two breweries, claiming that passive smoking has caused her illness.
The CRS report, whose second author is public-finance specialist Dennis Zimmerman, points out that the EPA assessment is based on "a group of 30 studies of which six found a statistically significant (but small) effect, 24 found no statistically significant effect, and six of the 24 found a passive smoking effect opposite to the expected relationship.
For the past 40 years, evidence has been accumulating on the effects of passive smoking on the fetus and on children.
Past evidence linking passive smoking and childhood illness, particularly respiratory disease, led the researchers to look into the role of postnatal smoke exposure in SIDS risk.