passive smoking

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passive smoking

A general term for involuntary inhalation of cigarette smoke by nonsmokers, who breathe ambient air containing carcinogens inhaled by an “active” smoker. Passive smoking causes an estimated 2500–8400 excess annual cases of smoking-related malignancy (US). “Mainstream” smoke is directly inhaled by the smoker; “sidestream” environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) is produced by the smoker but absorbed more readily by nonsmokers, who do not have the benefit of a fiiter. Physical space separation allows significant reduction in exposure to ETS or by nonsmokers.

Passive smokers are exposed to dimethylnitrosamine (a potent carcinogen), benzo(a)pyrene, carbon monoxide (CO), acrolein, arsenic, benzene, cyanide, formaldehyde, nitrosamines, radionuclides and others. Levels of nicotine in passive smoke in unventilated areas may exceed industrial threshold limit levels (> 500 pg/mm3); air zones with CO levels of > 30 ppm cause a passive smoker to have CO blood levels equivalent to having smoked approximatly five cigarettes; prolonged exposure to 30 ppm CO may cause carboxyhaemoglobin levels sufficient to impair visual discrimination and cause psychomotor impairment.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

passive smoking

Public health Involuntary 'smoking' by non-smokers who breathe ambient air containing carcinogenic inhalants from an 'active' cigarette smoker; PS ↑ platelet activity, accelerates ASHD, ↑ tissue damage in ischemia or acute MI; PS ↓ both cardiac delivery of O2 to the heart and myocardial ability to use O2 to produce ATP, resulting in ↓ exercise capacity in passive smokers, and ↑ risk of fatal and nonfatal cardiac events; exposure to 3 hrs/day of PS is associated with an ↑ in cervical CA; in children, neonates, and fetuses, PS is linked to ↓ pulmonary function, bronchitis, pneumonia, otitis media and middle ear effusions, asthma, lower birth and adult weight and height, SIDS, poor lung–and physical development, and ↑ perinatal mortality–due to placental vascular disease–eg, placenta previa and abruptio placentae, breast CA; ♀ exposed to PS before age 12 had an odds ratio of 4.5; such children are more likely to become smokers and are at ↑ risk for developing CA in a dose-related manner, in all sites 50% higher than expected, and up to two-fold ↑ in NHL, ALL, and Wilms' tumors; PS by children with cystic fibrosis adversely affects growth and health, resulting in ↑ hospital admissions and poor performance in pulmonary function tests. See Conicotine, Environmental tobacco smoke.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

passive smoking

Inhaling cigarette smoke exhaled by others. It has been shown that the rate of lung cancer in non-smokers rises significantly if they are regularly exposed to other people's cigarette smoke. At least 10 separate studies have shown an increase of up to 30% in the risk of lung cancer among non-smokers living with smokers, compared with non-smokers living with non-smokers.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Patient discussion about passive smoking

Q. what is a passive smoking? and is it dangerous as an active?

A. Passive smoking is the exposure to cigarettes smoke emitted from cigarettes smoke by other person. It's dangerous and may increase the risk to several diseases similar to active smoking (one's exposure to smoke emitted from the cigarettes he or she is smoking) although the risk is of lower magnitude. Example for passive smoking is children of smokers etc.

You may read more here:http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/secondhandsmoke.html

Q. Can I get lung cancer from passive smoking? All my friends smoke, can I get cancer by hanging out with them?

A. Yes, you can develop cancer by passive smoking. From what I've heard, non-smokers exposed to second-hand smoke at home or work, increase their risk of developing lung cancer by 20 percent to 30 percent.

Q. what is it a passive smoking? and is it bad as as the active smoking? can i get cancer from it?

A. Passive smoking is the involuntary exposure of nonsmokers to tobacco smoke from the smoking of others. It is considered dangerous, and cause increased risk of cancer, although to a lesser degree than active smoking.

You may read more here:
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/secondhandsmoke.html

More discussions about passive smoking
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References in periodicals archive ?
For passive smokers, smoke exposure related variables such as duration of exposure, proximity to the source, room size, ventilation and number of cigarette smoked as per the source of tobacco smoke.
Significant compared with never smoker and passive smoker p less than 0.01.
"There should be somewhere for people to enjoy a drink without having to be a passive smoker.
In the bargain, I am forced to be a passive smoker and it has started affecting my health, too.
Furthermore, we tried to find out the genotoxic effect of environmental tobacco smoke in the lymphocytes of active smoker's relative (passive smoker).
Preoperative pulmonary function tests, with or without urinary cotinine levels depending on the clinician, may be an early predictor of the course of the anaesthetic period in suspected passive smoker individuals who are prepared for general anaesthesia.
The number of smokers in the surroundings of a passive smoker (p=0.386) and ventilation status (p=0.150) were not statistically significant factors in relation to COPD.
"The second and third themes depict the pain and suffering of a passive smoker as well as the arduous death a smoker goes through," said Panase, whose father was a chain smoker.
A urine cotinine threshold value (ng/mL) below 10 was considered 'no exposure,' a value of 10-500 was considered as 'passive smoker,' and a value above 500 was considered as 'active smoker.' A urine cotinine/creatinine ratio of 30 and below was considered as 'no exposure' and a value above 30 was considered as 'passive smoker' (17, 18).
Regarding the measurement of carbon monoxide in the exhaled air, one passive smoker, one former smoker and eight non-smokers were classified as smokers by COex.
Sreelakshmi Satyan, 15, was encouraged to carry out this campaign after listening to a story of a cancer survivor and after her own grandfather, who was a passive smoker, died from lung cancer.