passive smoking

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passive smoking

the inhalation by nonsmokers of the smoke from other people's cigarettes, pipes, or cigars. The amount of such smoke inhaled by a nonsmoker is small compared with that inhaled by tobacco users. However, passive smoking can aggravate respiratory illnesses and contribute to serious diseases, including cancer. Infants, fetuses, and individuals with chronic heart and lung diseases or allergies to tobacco can be adversely affected by passive smoking. See also secondhand smoke.

passive smoking

A general term for involuntary inhalation of cigarette smoke by nonsmokers, who breathe ambient air containing carcinogens inhaled by an “active” smoker. Passive smoking causes an estimated 2500–8400 excess annual cases of smoking-related malignancy (US). “Mainstream” smoke is directly inhaled by the smoker; “sidestream” environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) is produced by the smoker but absorbed more readily by nonsmokers, who do not have the benefit of a fiiter. Physical space separation allows significant reduction in exposure to ETS or by nonsmokers.

Passive smokers are exposed to dimethylnitrosamine (a potent carcinogen), benzo(a)pyrene, carbon monoxide (CO), acrolein, arsenic, benzene, cyanide, formaldehyde, nitrosamines, radionuclides and others. Levels of nicotine in passive smoke in unventilated areas may exceed industrial threshold limit levels (> 500 pg/mm3); air zones with CO levels of > 30 ppm cause a passive smoker to have CO blood levels equivalent to having smoked approximatly five cigarettes; prolonged exposure to 30 ppm CO may cause carboxyhaemoglobin levels sufficient to impair visual discrimination and cause psychomotor impairment.

passive smoking

Public health Involuntary 'smoking' by non-smokers who breathe ambient air containing carcinogenic inhalants from an 'active' cigarette smoker; PS ↑ platelet activity, accelerates ASHD, ↑ tissue damage in ischemia or acute MI; PS ↓ both cardiac delivery of O2 to the heart and myocardial ability to use O2 to produce ATP, resulting in ↓ exercise capacity in passive smokers, and ↑ risk of fatal and nonfatal cardiac events; exposure to 3 hrs/day of PS is associated with an ↑ in cervical CA; in children, neonates, and fetuses, PS is linked to ↓ pulmonary function, bronchitis, pneumonia, otitis media and middle ear effusions, asthma, lower birth and adult weight and height, SIDS, poor lung–and physical development, and ↑ perinatal mortality–due to placental vascular disease–eg, placenta previa and abruptio placentae, breast CA; ♀ exposed to PS before age 12 had an odds ratio of 4.5; such children are more likely to become smokers and are at ↑ risk for developing CA in a dose-related manner, in all sites 50% higher than expected, and up to two-fold ↑ in NHL, ALL, and Wilms' tumors; PS by children with cystic fibrosis adversely affects growth and health, resulting in ↑ hospital admissions and poor performance in pulmonary function tests. See Conicotine, Environmental tobacco smoke.

passive smoking

Inhaling cigarette smoke exhaled by others. It has been shown that the rate of lung cancer in non-smokers rises significantly if they are regularly exposed to other people's cigarette smoke. At least 10 separate studies have shown an increase of up to 30% in the risk of lung cancer among non-smokers living with smokers, compared with non-smokers living with non-smokers.

Patient discussion about passive smoking

Q. what is a passive smoking? and is it dangerous as an active?

A. Passive smoking is the exposure to cigarettes smoke emitted from cigarettes smoke by other person. It's dangerous and may increase the risk to several diseases similar to active smoking (one's exposure to smoke emitted from the cigarettes he or she is smoking) although the risk is of lower magnitude. Example for passive smoking is children of smokers etc.

You may read more here:http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/secondhandsmoke.html

Q. Can I get lung cancer from passive smoking? All my friends smoke, can I get cancer by hanging out with them?

A. Yes, you can develop cancer by passive smoking. From what I've heard, non-smokers exposed to second-hand smoke at home or work, increase their risk of developing lung cancer by 20 percent to 30 percent.

Q. what is it a passive smoking? and is it bad as as the active smoking? can i get cancer from it?

A. Passive smoking is the involuntary exposure of nonsmokers to tobacco smoke from the smoking of others. It is considered dangerous, and cause increased risk of cancer, although to a lesser degree than active smoking.

You may read more here:
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/secondhandsmoke.html

More discussions about passive smoking
References in periodicals archive ?
For those who still had negative attitude on smoking issues, lack of understanding about the definition of passive smoker and its related CVD risk might be a cause.
Passive smokers may suffer from irritation to the eyes, runny nose, sore throat and headache.
Older children exposed to passive smokers show a slight decrease in lung function.
Although exposure is small as compared with that experienced by mainstream smokers, passive smokers who are in the same room may show pulmonary deposition of smoke particles as well as increased blood levels of nicotine and carboxyhaemoglobin.
CLINIQUE'S lab report on smoking shows that nicotine can add years to your appearance, regardless of whether you smoke or are a passive smoker.
THE rights of the passive smoker may be central to Scotland's ban on lighting up in public places, but an increasing number of smokers are seeing Sunday as the red letter day when they stub out their habit for good, health workers claimed yesterday.
And there's a good chance that, as a passive smoker, you too will die a slow, painful death.
I don't think graphic warnings on cigarette packs will make any difference," says Ayman Jarallah, a Saudi passive smoker.
It will be a sad day indeed if any patient is rejected from treatment simply because they acquired an ailment through being a passive smoker.
In doing so they always seem to remark "I'll become a passive smoker to join you lot".
But by going out you have already become a smoker as you smoke on average three cigarettes a night as a passive smoker.
However, it may be detected in a passive smoker if he or she has been in direct contact with smoke for a long time.