passive learning

in·ci·den·tal learn·ing

learning without a direct attempt.
Synonym(s): passive learning
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

passive learning

Education The acquisition of knowledge without active effort–eg, by listening to audiocassettes, exposure in the working environment. See Spoon-feeding.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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Challenge of shifting from passive learning to self-directed learning was discussed by all four facilitators but only three students.
A motivator for embarking on this autoethnographic journey was to identify learning and teaching theories related to non-traditional (to me) classroom instructional strategies that include active instead of passive learning. Specifically, my instructional goal was that in the process of learning the basics of research methods, my students would experience transformative learning.
Recent researches have proven that passive learning of the students make them lethargic and limit their thought process.
"This is not the usual passive learning conference where the learning is individually driven.
Empowering them to set goals based on their values and aspirations transforms them from a state of passive learning to active making.
passive learning rather than didactic teaching and adult learning.
He noted that the structure of the training provided by centre is unique in terms of being interactive and engaging in contrast to monotonic lecture-based passive learning."Practical application is important for students to understand concepts and operationalise their learning once they go back to the workplace in order to make a difference for their businesses," he added.
It shows how BR moved diagonally upwards from Passive Learning Networks and Assimilative Capability to Innovation Networks and Generative Capabilities.
In the traditional classroom lecture learning, the students acquire knowledge by passive learning with a number of limitations.
Some more stats: Active learning (learning by doing) has an 80 percent retention rate three months after the training; passive learning (typical in a classroom setting) has only a 30 percent retention rate.
Without putting enough effort in designing and developing well thought-out small group learning activities facilitated by competent facilitators, the passive learning that characterizes traditional lectures may persist in small group learning activities.

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