passive immunity


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Related to passive immunity: innate immunity, artificial passive immunity

ac·quired im·mu·ni·ty

resistance resulting from previous exposure of an individual in question to an infectious agent or antigen; it may be active and specific, as a result of naturally acquired (apparent or inapparent) infection or intentional vaccination (artificial active immunity); or it may be passive, being acquired through transfer of antibodies from another person or from an animal, either naturally, as from mother to fetus, or by intentional inoculation (artificial passive immunity).
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

passive immunity

n.
Immunity acquired by the transfer of antibodies from another individual, as through injection or placental transfer to a fetus.

passive immunization n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

passive immunity

Immunology Immunity conferred by an antibody produced in another host and acquired naturally by an infant from its mother or artificially by administration of an antibody-containing preparation–antiserum or immune globulin
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ac·quired im·mu·ni·ty

(ă-kwīrd' i-myū'ni-tē)
Resistance resulting from previous exposure of the individual in question to an infectious agent or antigen; it may be active, as a result of naturally acquired infection or vaccination; or passive, being acquired from transfer of antibodies from another person or from an animal, either from mother to fetus or by inoculation.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

passive immunity

Immunity, especially to specific infections, resulting from the acquisition of ANTIBODIES, either by injection or by transfer through the PLACENTA or ingestion in the breast milk. Sensitized T cells can also confer passive immunity.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

passive immunity

see ANTIBODY.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

ac·quired im·mu·ni·ty

(ă-kwīrd' i-myū'ni-tē)
Resistance due to previous exposure of the individual in question to an infectious agent or antigen; may be active, due to naturally acquired infection or vaccination; or passive, acquired from transfer of antibodies from another person or animal, either from mother to fetus or by inoculation.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
* Whey protein concentrates, colostrum derived: Whey protein concentrates are associated with immunoglobulin concentrates; immunoglobulins offer passive immunity and disease protection.
But this so-called passive immunity only lasts for so long.
Antibodies also can come from an outside source, creating "Passive Immunity." Colostrum contains many antibodies (also called immunoglobulins or Ig).
Artifically acquired passive immunity Protection from disease conferred byintensionally administering antibodies fromed by another another or person.
It is contemplated that the present invention is useful to detect antibodies for ascertaining adenovirus infection, evaluating patient response to gene therapy using adenovirus vectors, developing vaccines to adenovirus infection, developing therapeutics for inducing passive immunity to adenovirus infection, as well as other uses.
In bovine colostrum, the immunoglobulin antibodies have a major antimicrobial effect against a wide range of microbes and confer a passive immunity until the calf's own immune system has matured.
Colostrum provides passive immunity for the newborn.
The Cedars-Sinai survey points up one potentially fruitful avenue: improved physician understanding that maternal vaccination provides neonatal protection through passive immunity. This could be a compelling argument with pregnant women.
is the apparent outbreak of hepatitis A in Belgian hemophiliacs due to a loss of previous passive immunity? Vox Sang 1994;67(suppl 1):14-7.
The mother's milk provides the baby with passive immunity (protection not obtained by having the disease or making one's own antibodies).
The level of plasma IgG was over 10 mg/mL, which indicated the successful transfer of passive immunity in Jersey and Holstein calves.

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