passion


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pas·sion

(pash'ŭn),
1. Intense emotion.
2. Obsolete term for suffering or pain.
[L. passio, fr. patior, pp. passus, to suffer]

passion

A nonspecific term no longer used in medicine for:
(1) Intense emotion; 
(2) Pain and/or suffering.

passion

(pash′ŏn) [L. passio, suffering]
1. Suffering.
2. Great emotion or zeal.
References in classic literature ?
There are again two methods of removing the causes of faction: the one, by destroying the liberty which is essential to its existence; the other, by giving to every citizen the same opinions, the same passions, and the same interests.
As long as the connection subsists between his reason and his self-love, his opinions and his passions will have a reciprocal influence on each other; and the former will be objects to which the latter will attach themselves.
Yes, I replied, if passion, which has already been shown to be different from desire, turn out also to be different from reason.
Excellent, I said, and you may see passion equally in brute animals, which is a further proof of the truth of what you are saying.
"This, sire," replied D'Artagnan: "you cause a man to be arrested when you are still under his roof; and passion is alone the cause of that.
"A man who has never found opposition or resistance in any one, who lavishes his gold and jewels in every direction, and who retains his staff of painters in order to take the portraits of his mistresses in the costume of goddesses." The king trembled with passion as he continued, "He pollutes and profanes everything that belongs to me!
They parted; the Indian girl in tears, and the madcap trapper more than ever, with his thwarted passion.
A couple of horses were declared to be a fair compensation for the loss of a woman who had previously lost her heart; with this, the Shoshonie brave was fain to pacify his passion. He returned to Captain Bonneville's camp, somewhat crestfallen, it is true; but parried the officious condolements of his friends by observing that two good horses were very good pay for one bad wife.
He was a most offensive brute, though he had an extraordinary passion for Shakespeare.
I want a breath of our passion to stir their dust into consciousness, to wake their ashes into pain.
The like force has the passion over all his nature.
From exchanging glances, they advance to acts of courtesy, of gallantry, then to fiery passion, to plighting troth and marriage.