passion


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pas·sion

(pash'ŭn),
1. Intense emotion.
2. Obsolete term for suffering or pain.
[L. passio, fr. patior, pp. passus, to suffer]

passion

A nonspecific term no longer used in medicine for:
(1) Intense emotion; 
(2) Pain and/or suffering.

passion

(pash′ŏn) [L. passio, suffering]
1. Suffering.
2. Great emotion or zeal.
References in classic literature ?
And Jo dropped down beside the bed in a passion of penitent tears, telling all that had happened, bitterly condemning her hardness of heart, and sobbing out her gratitude for being spared the heavy punishment which might have come upon her.
Meanwhile Robert, addressing Mrs Pontellier, continued to tell of his one time hopeless passion for Madame Ratignolle; of sleepless nights, of consuming flames till the very sea sizzled when he took his daily plunge.
A few, and they not the least powerful and terrific of the band, threw lowering looks, in which the fiercest passion was only tempered by habitual self-command, at those captives who still remained in their power, while one or two even gave vent to their malignant feelings by the most menacing gestures, against which neither the sex nor the beauty of the sisters was any protection.
They would take neither the glow of passion nor the tenderness of sentiment, but retained all the rigidity of dead corpses, and stared me in the face with a fixed and ghastly grin of contemptuous defiance.
Another suitor might feel jealousy while he touched this string; but my firm purpose cannot be changed by a passion so childish and so hopeless.
A grande passion is the privilege of people who have nothing to do.
Is not the love of wealth as domineering and enterprising a passion as that of power or glory?
By a faction, I understand a number of citizens, whether amounting to a majority or a minority of the whole, who are united and actuated by some common impulse of passion, or of interest, adversed to the rights of other citizens, or to the permanent and aggregate interests of the community.
His work in the city library escaped attention, and he buried in his soul his thoughts of fame, fearing that they might injure him; but deeper than all lay buried within him the secret of his heart,--a passion which hollowed his cheeks and yellowed his brow.
It connotes at once passion, expression, fine criticism, good learning, and a document.
A festive winter Conversion of the Shoshonies Visit of two free trappers Gayety in the camp A touch of the tender passion The reclaimed squaw An Indian fine lady An elopement A pursuit Market value of a bad wife.
My passions, from that hapless hour, Usurp'd a tyranny which men Have deem'd, since I have reach'd to power; My innate nature - be it so: But, father, there liv'd one who, then, Then - in my boyhood - when their fire Burn'd with a still intenser glow,(For passion must, with youth, expire) E'en then who knew this iron heart In woman's weakness had a part.