passerine

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Related to Passerines: Passeriformes, Perching birds

passerine

(păs′ə-rīn′)
adj.
Of or relating to birds of the order Passeriformes, which have feet specialized for grasping branches and similar structures, with the first toe facing backward. The order includes the songbirds and certain other groups, such as the flycatchers of the Americas.
n.
A bird of the order Passeriformes. Also called perching bird.

passerine

any member of the avian order Passeriformes (singing or perching birds), which includes some half of the known species of birds.
References in periodicals archive ?
In populations of some mature-forest breeding passerines, fledglings have been found to exhibit shifts in habitat using broad habitat types that differ greatly from their natal habitats --particularly early successional forest (Anders et al., 1998; White et al., 2005; Vitz and Rodewald, 2006; Streby and Andersen, 2013; Dittmar et al., 2014).
This contrasts with other Passerines such as: Northern Rough-winged Swallow (6.8 flight feathers, Yuri and Rohwer 1997), Wedge-tailed Grass-Finch (Emberizoides herbicola Vieillot, 1817) (7.0), Lesser Elaenia (Elaenia chiriquensis Lawrence, 1865) (6.0), Plain-crested Elaenia (E.
Total passerine nest success was greater on burned than on unburned plots (Fig.
The pattern of origin by fleshy fibers and insertion by aponeurosis for this muscle appears to be conservative in passerines (Richards and Bock, 1973; Donatelli, 1997; Donatelli and Marceliano, 2007).
As far as we are aware, these are the first confirmed records of double brooding in Arctic populations of Northern Wheatears or in any other Arctic-breeding passerines, with the possible exception of rare and geographically marginal cases in the Common Redpoll.
Renfrew and others (2005) reported that raccoons and opossums, known grassland passerine predators, were most active along wooded edges of pastures in Wisconsin.
(1) determining the relative abundance, activity, and distribution of small mammals in meadows of the Sierra Nevada; (2) determining the influence of meadow wetness on the activity and abundance of potential nest predators; and (3) providing management recommendations for the implementation of restoration practices to improve meadow conditions for passerines such as the California state endangered Willow Flycatcher.
This reduction in passerine numbers, both resident species and summer migrants, has never received the same funding or urgent action as applied to the losses and reintroduction of the more spectacular birds.
However, another study in Illinois determined that Acadian Flycatchers may be less sensitive to fragmentation than other forest passerines in Illinois and may exhibit reproductive success in narrow riparian corridors (Chapa-Vargas and Robinson, 2007).
College-level collections strong in South American nature guides, particularly those possessing prior volumes in the series, will find "Field Guide to Songbirds of South America: The Passerines" continues the trend as an essential reference for professional ornithologists and birders: the only volumes to provide complete scientific coverage of the continent's passerines.
In his study of the Carpinteria passerines (1932) he found only the latter species and accepted the changes in taxonomy that elevated C.
Passerine (pahs-er-en) is the largest order of birds, with more than 50 percent of bird species being passerines.