pigeon

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pigeon

a member of the family Columbidae which also includes the doves. The domestic pigeons are generally gray, medium-sized birds which exist in a large number of breeds and races including Romans, Jacobins, tumblers, fantails, pouters, carrier pigeons and turtle-doves.

pigeon berry
phytolaccaamericana.
pigeon breast
deep-seated abscesses in the pectoral muscles of horses. Called also pectoral abscess.
pigeon-breeder's lung
see bird-fancier's lung.
carrier pigeon
pigeon with strong homing instincts used to carry messages over relatively long distances. Produced by breeding and selection between races of domestic pigeons. See also homing pigeon (below).
pigeon circovirus
the cause of lethargy, respiratory and gastrointestinal signs and poor racing performance in young pigeons.
pigeon fly
a member of the parasitic fly family Hippoboscidae or louse fly and an important parasite of domestic pigeon. Called also Pseudolynchia canariensis.
pigeon grass
panicum whitei, setaria spp.
pigeon herpesvirus
the cause of respiratory disease (coryza) in domestic pigeons.
homing pigeon
pigeon with strong homing instincts used in racing and as a carrier pigeon (above). Produced by breeding and selection between races of domestic pigeon.
pigeon pox
slender (small) pigeon louse
columbicolacolumbae.
pigeon strongyle
ornithostrongylusquadriradiatus.
pigeon toed
a condition in which the toes are turned inwards.
References in periodicals archive ?
And knowing this about the passenger pigeon ecology, we think [bringing them back] is going to be a major benefit for the ecosystems of the future.
These authors (and some who have come before) don't always say it, but clearly show that much of what we know of the Passenger Pigeon is based on hearsay and informal untestable descriptions by individuals with little or no training in science.
Likewise, it is not clear that the passenger pigeon was the valuable resource farther east; rather, it was the land on which the food they ate grew.
Mass nesting in unpredictable locations was an effective reproductive strategy for the passenger pigeon as a species.
The most advanced efforts so far have focused on the passenger pigeon.
The scientists then are going to inject the germ cells into developing band-tailed pigeons and as those birds mate, their eventual offspring will express the passenger pigeon genes, which is as close to being passenger pigeons as the available genetic material allows.
But American history brims with other, more long-term catastrophes: From the perspective of a bison or a (now-extinct) passenger pigeon, the whole thing might look like one long disaster.
They will go the way of the vast flocks of the Passenger Pigeon and the Carolina Parakeet which were reduced to extinction in 100 years.
And if we procrastinate too long, it will be too late and all precious rare creatures and plants will be gone the way of the Passenger Pigeon.
The passenger pigeon isn't going to pull the Lazarus act, the famous phoenix 360[degrees], of that reed warbler: not a one of the dozens of miles of thundering clouds of those birds survived our sharp and profligate aim; nor will my mother ever boil water for the tea again, or nightly wipe the dog's eyes of their rheum, or light her husband's yahrtzeit candle when his death-day circles back: that candle flicker and that kettle steam remain here on the planet, but not her.
They now stand alongside the passenger pigeon and the dodo as symbols of the human exploitation of wildlife.
Chapters in this part describe resource extraction efforts by Europeans, including the French fur trade, the logging of northern Minnesota and Wisconsin forests (which were decimated with incredible rapidity by the early 1900s), commercial hunting and subsequent extinction of the passenger pigeon, and the pearl button industry.