passage


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pas·sage

(pas'ăj),
1. The act of passing.
2. A discharge, as from the bowels or of urine.
3. Inoculation of a series of animals with the same strain of a pathogenic microorganism whereby the virulence usually is increased, but is sometimes diminished.
4. A channel, duct, pore, or opening.
[Mediev. L. passo, to pass]

passage

(păs′ĭj)
n.
1.
a. A path, channel, or duct through, over, or along which something may pass: the nasal passages.
b. A corridor.
2. Physiology The process of discharging something from a bodily part, such as evacuation of waste from the bowels.
3. Medicine The introduction of an instrument into a bodily cavity.
References in classic literature ?
In the instant of time in which all this happened Father Brown stepped out into the top of the passage, looked down it, and at once walked briskly towards what he saw.
They entered the stone-lined passage. In spite of the fact that it had probably been buried and concealed from light and air for centuries, as evidenced by the growth of the giant trees above it, the air was fresh.
The stone passage here was exactly similar, except that more doors opened out of it, to the passage on the first floor.
Following the passage for about fifteen paces farther, we came suddenly to an elaborately painted wooden door.
"Yes; a subterranean passage, which I have named the Arabian Tunnel.
In another minute they heard the supper-party turn out and come down the passage to their door.
Weston at the same time, walking briskly with long steps through the passage, was calling out,
The viscount, therefore, remained in the room watching Christine as she slowly returned to life, while even the joint managers, Debienne and Poligny, who had come to offer their sympathy and congratulations, found themselves thrust into the passage among the crowd of dandies.
With that, they stepped back again, keeping their faces towards the crowd; took each an arm of the misguided nobleman; drew him into the passage, and shut the door; which they directly locked and fastened on the inside.
The writer here interrupts an Iliadic passage (to which she returns immediately) for the double purpose of dwelling upon the slaughter of the heifer, and of letting Nestor's wife and daughter enjoy it also.
And then one day, maybe twenty years ago, or twenty-five, there came a schooner right through the passage and into the lagoon.
While we were at Diou, waiting for these vessels, we received advice from Aethiopia that the emperor, unwilling to expose the patriarch to any hazard, thought Dagher, a port in the mouth of the Red Sea, belonging to a prince dependent on the Abyssins, a place of the greatest security to land at, having already written to that prince to give him safe passage through his dominions.