passage


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pas·sage

(pas'ăj),
1. The act of passing.
2. A discharge, as from the bowels or of urine.
3. Inoculation of a series of animals with the same strain of a pathogenic microorganism whereby the virulence usually is increased, but is sometimes diminished.
4. A channel, duct, pore, or opening.
[Mediev. L. passo, to pass]

passage

(păs′ĭj)
n.
1.
a. A path, channel, or duct through, over, or along which something may pass: the nasal passages.
b. A corridor.
2. Physiology The process of discharging something from a bodily part, such as evacuation of waste from the bowels.
3. Medicine The introduction of an instrument into a bodily cavity.

passage

[pas′ij]
1 an opening, channel, route, or gap.
2 the movement of something from one place to another, as in evacuation of the bowels.

passage

introduction followed by recovery of an infectious agent in an experimental animal or culture medium.

blind passage
passage of an infectious agent through an experimental animal or medium without there being any evidence, clinical or cultural, that the agent is present.
serial passage
repeated passage through a series of experimental animals or media, often with the objective of altering the virulence of the agent or adapting it to grow better.
References in classic literature ?
There was a silence; and then Seymour said, with an emphasis quite alien to his daily accent: "But I saw a man in the passage.
He had remained behind them in the passage while they were trying to move the rock.
Just as she stopped among the rambling stone passages on the basement story of the house, uncertain which way to turn next, she heard the tuneless old voice in the distance, singing these lines:
By now we are running down the passage, and this is what the light from the lamp shows us.
Not only does this passage exist, but I have profited by it several times.
So the strife settled down into a personal affair between Flashman and our youngsters--a war to the knife, to be fought out in the little cockpit at the end of the bottom passage.
When the passage was once more deserted, he crossed it, opened the door of the dressing-room, went in and shut the door.
With that, they stepped back again, keeping their faces towards the crowd; took each an arm of the misguided nobleman; drew him into the passage, and shut the door; which they directly locked and fastened on the inside.
I have dealt with this passage somewhat more fully in my "Authoress of the Odyssey", p.
As we came down upon him, covering the sea and blowing our conches, he put off from the schooner in the small boat, along with the three black boys, and rowed for the passage.
We continued our course towards the Red Sea, meeting with nothing in our passage but a gelve, or kind of boat, made of thin boards, sewed together, with no other sail than a mat.
When you enter (as you never will) the Vernon Hotel, you pass down a short passage decorated with a few dingy but important pictures, and come to the main vestibule and lounge which opens on your right into passages leading to the public rooms, and on your left to a similar passage pointing to the kitchens and offices of the hotel.