parvoviruses


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parvoviruses

A family of viruses that cause RUBELLA-like illnesses, transient joint pain and, in sickle cell disease, a failure of production of blood cells. Parvovirus B19 enjoys worldwide infectivity by droplet and has been spread in blood products. It causes Fifth disease, arthralgia and inflammatory arthritis, transient aplasia of red blood cells, miscarriage and hydrops fetalis. Immune globulins are an effective treatment.
References in periodicals archive ?
Latex agglutination test for detecting feline panleukopenia virus, canine parvovirus, and parvoviruses of fur animals.
Frequent detection of the parvoviruses, PARV4 and PARV5, in plasma from blood donors and symptomatic individuals.
To clarify whether interspecies transmission is possible for primate PARV4like viruses, as has been shown for other parvoviruses (9), we investigated samples in a setting where transmission of certain simian viruses between these species has been documented (10,11).
Conserved protein domains typical of parvoviruses were identified in GFADV.
Her research interests include clinical characteristics of parvoviruses.
PARV4 differs strikingly from other parvoviruses in its epidemiologic associations and inferred routes of transmission.
Because VPs are responsible for the entry of parvoviruses, they usually adapt to host-specific receptor(s).
To the Editor: Parvoviruses (PARV) 4 and 5 are 2 genotypes of a novel human parvovirus, with 92% nucleotide identity, identified in the plasma sample of a patient screened for acute HIV infection and in samples of manufactured plasma pools (1,2).
The findings of our study provide evidence that PARV4 is primarily or exclusively transmitted through parenteral routes, a marked contrast to predominantly respiratory routes of transmission of parvoviruses in other genera, including B 19 and human bocavirus (11).
To the Editor: Parvoviruses are small, nonenveloped DNA viruses that infect both vertebrate and invertebrate hosts.
In addition, HBoV, similar to some adenoviruses (14) and other human parvoviruses, may show persistent shedding after an initial acute infection.
Parvovirus B19 and HBoV are the only 2 parvoviruses known to be pathogenic to humans, but the relevance of HBoV infection in the clinical setting is not known.