parvoviruses


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

parvoviruses

A family of viruses that cause RUBELLA-like illnesses, transient joint pain and, in sickle cell disease, a failure of production of blood cells. Parvovirus B19 enjoys worldwide infectivity by droplet and has been spread in blood products. It causes Fifth disease, arthralgia and inflammatory arthritis, transient aplasia of red blood cells, miscarriage and hydrops fetalis. Immune globulins are an effective treatment.
References in periodicals archive ?
Full-genome sequence alignment showed a high degree of sequence divergence, up to 58% overall nucleotide identity to most parvoviruses but not bufaviruses.
Typical icosahedral structures of parvoviruses with a diameter of approximately 25-30 nm were observed indicating that PPV VP2 protein is self-assembled to VLPs (Figure 2(a)).
Latex agglutination test for detecting feline panleukopenia virus, canine parvovirus, and parvoviruses of fur animals.
Bioinformatics of sequence data revealed a 4.5-kb base assembled sequence in the horse liver sample that showed distant yet significant protein similarity with known bovine and porcine parvoviruses. Thereafter, the in silico assembled sequence data were used to design primers for amplifying the complete genome of the new parvovirus, tentatively named EqPVH.
This discovery of MpBuV urged us to further investigate BuVs and related parvoviruses in wildlife.
Frequent detection of the parvoviruses, PARV4 and PARV5, in plasma from blood donors and symptomatic individuals.
To clarify whether interspecies transmission is possible for primate PARV4like viruses, as has been shown for other parvoviruses (9), we investigated samples in a setting where transmission of certain simian viruses between these species has been documented (10,11).
Conserved protein domains typical of parvoviruses were identified in GFADV.
Comparison of tissue distribution, persistence, and molecular epidemiology of parvovirus B19 and novel human parvoviruses PARV4 and human bocavirus.
Because PARV4 IgG seroprevalence in group 1 was 0% in this study, in contrast to prevalences of 60% for B19 (12) and 96% for HBoV (9) in the same students, serologic cross-reactivity between PARV4 and the other human parvoviruses appears highly unlikely.
Although infections with PARV4 are not followed by long-term viremia, viral DNA sequences can likely be detected in tissues lifelong after exposure (3-6), a form of latency or persistence shared with other human parvoviruses, e.g., human parvovirus B19, and adeno-associated viruses (6-8).