parvovirus


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Related to parvovirus: Canine parvovirus, distemper

parvovirus

 [pahr´vo-vi″rus]
a group of extremely small, morphologically similar, ether-resistant DNA viruses, including the adeno-associated viruses.
human parvovirus B19 B19 virus.

Par·vo·vi·rus

(par'vō-vī'rŭs),
A genus of viruses (family Parvoviridae) that replicate autonomously in suitable cells. Strain B19 infects humans, causing erythema infectiosum and aplastic crisis in hemolytic anemia.
[L. parvus, small, + virus]

parvovirus

/par·vo·vi·rus/ (pahr´vo-vi″rus) any virus belonging to the family Parvoviridae.

Parvovirus

/Par·vo·vi·rus/ (pahr´vo-vi″rus) parvoviruses; a genus of viruses (family Parvoviridae) infecting mammals and birds; human parvoviruses cause aplastic crisis, erythema infectiosum, hydrops fetalis, spontaneous abortion, and fetal death.

parvovirus

(pär′vō-vī′rəs)
n. pl. parvovi·ruses
1. Any of a family of very small DNA viruses that cause various diseases in animals, including feline panleukopenia, canine parvovirus, and fifth disease in humans.
2.
a. A highly contagious infectious disease of dogs, especially puppies, characterized by lethargy, fever, vomiting, and diarrhea. It is spread through feces from infected animals.
b. The parvovirus that is the causative agent of this disease. In both subsenses also called canine parvovirus, parvo.

Par·vo·vi·rus

(pahr'vō-vī'rŭs)
A genus of viruses that replicate autonomously in suitable cells.
[L. parvus, small, + virus]

parvovirus

a virus of the familyParvoviridae.

bovine parvovirus
commonly infects the intestinal tract of cattle, but does not cause clinical disease; called also Hadenvirus or hemadsorbing enterovirus.
canine parvovirus type 1 (CPV1)
is not associated with clinical disease. Called also minute canine virus (MCV).
canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV2)
the cause of enteritis in dogs, particularly puppies. Clinical signs include vomiting and diarrhea, often with blood, high fever, dehydration and a leukopenia. Perinatal or in utero infection may result in generalized disease or acute myocarditis. There is a high mortality rate in young puppies, but vaccines are available for prevention of the disease.
feline parvovirus
see feline panleukopenia.
porcine parvovirus
a cause of stillbirths, abortion, mummification, embryonic death and infertility in young sows (SMEDI) which become infected with a parvovirus in early gestation.
References in periodicals archive ?
The death rate from parvovirus among infected puppies and dogs therefore remains very high, even though "gold standard" supportive treatment is very effective at helping patients whose owners can afford it to survive.
Although most parvovirus infections in pregnant women don't harm the fetus, human parvovirus B19 (B19V) may cause severe fetal anemia and cardiac failure, potentially leading to nonimmune fetal hydrops.
Partial VP2 sequencing of canine parvovirus (CPV) strains circulating in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: detection of the new variant CPV-2c.
Recent parvovirus B19 infection was diagnosed by the presence of serum IgM antibodies or detection of B19 DNA.
Parvovirus infection with an expanded clinical manifestation may precede or be associated with leukemia.
PARVOVIRUS is one of the diseases that are protected against with the annual vaccination and so it is something I discuss regularly in the consulting room.
Although her previous owner claimed she had been vaccinated, she had no vaccination card as proof and after four months Beaufell ill with parvovirus.
Contract award notice: Delivery of reagents for hcv rna, Hiv rna and hbv dna, And parvovirus b19 (b19v) dna and rna for dna analysis using molecular biology and wear and tear materials as well as lease of the necessary equipment for automated testing and archiving.
And dog lovers are warned to be careful where they buy their pets, as it's thought the puppies were already infected with dangerous parvovirus before they were sold.
Because it is a virus, there is no specific cure for parvovirus.