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part

 
a division of a larger structure.
mastoid part of temporal bone the posterior portion of the petrous (or petromastoid) part. Called also mastoid bone.
petromastoid part of temporal bone see petrous part of temporal bone.
petrous part of temporal bone the part of the temporal bone located at the base of the cranium, containing the inner ear. Some anatomists divide it into two separate subparts, calling the posterior section the mastoid part, reserving the term petrous part for the anterior section only, and calling the entire area the petromastoid part. Called also petrous bone.
squamous part of temporal bone the flat, scalelike, anterior superior portion of the temporal bone. Called also squamous bone.
tympanic part of temporal bone the part of the temporal bone forming the anterior and inferior walls and part of the posterior wall of the external acoustic meatus. Called also tympanic bone.

part

(part),
A portion.
Synonym(s): pars [TA]

part

(pahrt) a division of a larger structure.
mastoid part of temporal bone  mastoid bone; the irregular, posterior part of the temporal bone.
petromastoid part of temporal bone  see petrous p. of temporal bone.
petrous part of temporal bone  petrous bone; the part of the temporal bone at the base of the cranium, containing the inner ear. Some divide it into two subparts, calling the posterior section the mastoid part, reserving the term petrous part for the anterior section only, and calling the entire area the petromastoid part.
squamous part of temporal bone  squamous bone; the flat, scalelike, anterior superior portion of the temporal bone.
tympanic part of temporal bone  tympanic bone; the part of the temporal bone forming the anterior and inferior walls and part of the posterior wall of the external acoustic meatus.

part

Etymology: L, pars
a part of a larger area, such as the condylar part of the occipital bone. See also pars.

part

(pahrt)
[TA] A portion.
Synonym(s): pars [TA] .

Patient discussion about part

Q. I have a constant pain in the inside part of my arm. What can it be? In the last few weeks I have noticed that I have a right arm pain. The strange thing is that the pain is in a specific point in the inside part of the arm, very near to the elbow. I thnk the pain started for the first time during a baseball game but I am not sure. I work in a factory and as I sad before I use my right arm for baseball, and this pain hinders me. What can it be?

A. I myself play a lot as a pitcher, and i have the same pain. It is more painful when the forearm is flexed towards the body.
I went to my GP about it because it drove me nuts, and he said that I need to take anti-inflammatory drugs, and if it will not work he will inject me something.
he prescribed me a great medication and I didn't need the injection.

Q. I walk a lot but why do I lose weight all over the body but not in any specific part of body?

A. Your fat is stored in fat cells. Now when you exercise the fat cells release the fat to give energy to your body. Some hormones which run in your blood during exercise in high amount stimulate these fat cells to release fat for energy. During exercise like walking the blood flow increases and the hormones can release the fats from any cell of the body equally and even the hormones can recognize any fat cells.

Q. in what part of pregnancy can i find out if my unborn child has Autism or any other health issue?

A. Autism can't be diagnosed before birth, and actually not until the child grows. Other health issues - no once can guarantee you a perfect, problem-less child - there are conditions that are impossible to be diagnosed during pregnancy. However, if you're concerned about this subject, you may want to consult your doctor (e.g. a gynecologist) in order to receive a more personal and comprehensive answer.

You may read more here: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/pregnancy.html

More discussions about part
References in periodicals archive ?
full-time and part-time adult employees on their careers to better understand the evolving shift in priorities taking place across the American workforce as well as the impact that full-time and part-time work has on careers.
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