pars planitis

pars planitis

(pars pla-ni'tis)
Inflammation of the anterior chamber, the anterior vitreous, and/or the peripheral retina of the eye. It commonly causes floaters and blurring of vision. The disease may occur in childhood or adulthood. It is associated with autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis or sarcoidosis and infectious diseases such as Lyme disease, syphilis, or tuberculosis. Treatments include treatment of the underlying illness and/or laser or cryotherapy. Synonym: intermediate uveitis
References in periodicals archive ?
Peripapillary CNVM are also known to occur with other diseases including ocular histoplasmosis (OHS), angioid streaks, pars planitis, optic disc drusen, choroidal osteoma, and pattern dystrophies [1].
Table 1 Classification of uveitis Type of uveitis Location State of inflammation Anterior Iris Iritis Ciliary body Anterior cyclitis Iris and ciliary body Iridocyclitis Intermediate Vitreous Vitritis Hyalitis Pars planitis Posterior Choroid Choroiditis Retina Retinitis Neuroretinitis Choroid and retina Chorioretinitis Retinochoroiditis Pan-uveitis All of the above All of the above Table 2 Prednisolone acetate 1% Prednisolone sodium phosphate 0.1-0.5% Fluorometholone 0.1% Rimexolone 1% Loteprednol etabonate 0.5% Table 3 Immunosuppressive drugs Table 3 Class Examples Antimetabolites Azathioprine Methotrexate Mycophenolate mofetil Alkylating agents Cyclophosphamide Chlorambucil Antibiotics Cyclosporine Tacromimus Rapamycin Dapsone Adjuvants Bromocriptine Ketoconazole Colchicine
MS patients may show signs of ocular inflammation such as uveitis, pars planitis or retinal vasculitis.
REVIEW OF LITERATURE: Cataracts are a common complication of many forms of uveitis, with incidence rates, approaching 50% in uveitis associated with Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (1-3) pars planitis (4) and Fuchs' syndrome.
3), Eale's disease, vasculitis, pars planitis and sickle cell anemia.
That began a nine-year saga of many conventional ophthalmologic interventions to treat her retinal tears, uveitis, pars planitis, retinal scarring, macular edema, synechia, glaucoma, and cataracts.
Results: In 85% of the patients, a classified form of uveitis was observed: associated systemic diseases were found in 24%, the most frequent one being sarcoidosis (9.8%) and V-K-H syndrome (7.4%); ocular syndromes were present in 10%, the most frequent being birdshot retinochoroidopathy (6.1%) and pars planitis (3.7%); and infections in 48%, the most frequent being tuberculosis (50.6%) and hepatitis (4.9%).
Inflammatory etiologies include uveitis-glaucoma-hyphema syndrome, sympathetic ophthalmia, sarcoidosis, pars planitis, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, birdshot chorioretinopathy, Behcet disease, Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease, sterile endophthalmitis, multifocal choroiditis, and acute posterior multifocal placoid pigment epitheliopathy.
Practical knowledge and current developments are delivered in an engaging question-and-answer format through 21 chapters covering the basic mechanisms of ocular inflammation; signs, symptoms, and classification of uveitis; laboratory testing techniques; local and systemic treatments for all forms of uveitis; complications of the disease; systemic disease associations of uveitic conditions; differential diagnosis of different presentations; pars planitis and intermediate uveitis; infectious and autoimmune forms of posterior uveitis; and a review of the white dot syndromes.
OLM is characterized by endophthalmitis, uveitis, pars planitis and granuloma formation (Gillespie et.al., 1993).
[9] reported that visual acuity improvement was observed in 20 of 22 eyes (90.9%) and that the clinical course was improved in 19 eyes (86.4%), allowing for suspension of systemic treatment in 16 pars planitis patients.
Multiple sclerosis, sarcoidosis, and other diseases in patients with pars planitis. Dev Ophthalmol.

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