parricide


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par·ri·cide

(par'i-sīd),
1. The killing of one's parent (patricide or matricide).
2. One who commits such an act.
[L. parricidium, killing of close kin]
References in periodicals archive ?
The premier example of a parricide in the Policrnticus is Romulus, the founder of Rome, "who consecrated the omens of the city to the gods by his brother's blood.
Dans ses developpements ulterieurs, Freud montrera la facon dont le parricide originaire se trouve a l'origine de toutes les divinites qui ont peuple le << ciel >> de l'humanite.
6-9) In a study of 5,488 cases of parricide in the United States, 4,738 (86%) of perpetrators were male.
In recognizing his incest and parricide Oedipus becomes aware that he has lost the possibility of naming his parents.
Analysis of the Canadian data (1962 to 1985) indicates a positive correlation between parricide rates and criminal violence rates (r = .
But recent clemency actions on behalf of children imprisoned for parricide have focused on another type of betrayal - the breach of a child's love and trust by a parent's emotional, physical, or sexual abuse.
Yet at times even I have considered parricide, especially on those occasions when the CIA has shamed its country, its allies, even its own employees.
Surely after this season's wrenching news of child abuse, parricide, racial brutality and surrogate motherhood, we, too, the dutiful consumers of current events, are entitled to reap what amusement we can from the spectacle of Falwell challenging a girlie magazine's depiction of his late mother.
Cenci is known as the Beautiful Parricide, from a famous portrait in Rome's Barberini palace, attributed to Guido Reni.
Eleazar said charges of parricide would be filed against Estrera before the city prosecutor's office.
Un autre parricide a ete enregistre a Guelma ou un jeune homme a tue son pere age de 77 ans avec une arme blanche suite a une altercation.
Respect, Defense, and Self-Identity: Profiling Parricide in Nineteenth-Century America, 1852-1899