saliva

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saliva

 [sah-li´vah]
the enzyme-containing secretion of the salivary glands.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

sa·li·va

(să-lī'vă),
A clear, tasteless, odorless, slightly acidic (pH 6.8) viscid fluid, consisting of the secretion from the parotid, sublingual, and submandibular salivary glands and the mucous glands of the oral cavity; its function is to keep the mucous membrane of the mouth moist, to lubricate food during mastication, and, in a measure, to convert starch into maltose, the latter action being effected by a diastatic enzyme, ptyalin.
Synonym(s): spittle
[L. akin to G. sialon]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

saliva

(sə-lī′və)
n.
The watery mixture of secretions from the salivary and oral mucous glands that lubricates chewed food, moistens the oral walls, and contains ptyalin.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

saliva

Spit The clear, semifluid secretion of the major and minor salivary glands, and mucus-secreting cells of the oral cavity; saliva keeps the oral cavity moist, lubricates food during mastication–which facilitates deglutition, and, via its enzyme content-alpha amylase, begins the process of digestion. See Salivary glands, Sputum.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

sa·li·va

(să-lī'vă)
A clear, tasteless, odorless, slightly acid (pH 6.8) viscid fluid, consisting of the secretions from the parotid, sublingual, and submandibular salivary glands and the mucous glands of the oral cavity; its function is to keep the mucous membrane of the mouth moist, to lubricate food during mastication, and to convert starch into maltose.
Synonym(s): spittle.
[L. akin to G. sialon]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

saliva

A slightly alkaline, watery fluid secreted into the mouth by the SALIVARY GLANDS. Saliva contains the digestive enzyme amylase capable of breaking down starch to simpler sugars. Saliva keeps the mouth moist, dissolves taste particles in food so that they can stimulate the taste buds on the tongue and lubricates food during mastication to assist in swallowing.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

saliva

a viscous, transparent liquid containing water, salts, MUCIN and (sometimes) salivary AMYLASE. Saliva is secreted by cells of the salivary glands which, in humans, occur in three pairs, one in the cheek and two between the bones of the lower jaw. The quantity of saliva produced depends on the type of food being consumed. Dry foods and acidic foods stimulate a copious volume of nonviscous saliva, while liquids such as milk stimulate small quantities of thick saliva.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

sa·li·va

(să-lī'vă)
Clear, tasteless, odorless, slightly acidic (pH 6.8) viscid fluid, consisting of secretion from the parotid, sublingual, and submandibular salivary glands and the mucous glands of oral cavity; its function is to keep mucous membrane of mouth moist, to lubricate food during mastication, and, in some measure, to convert starch into maltose.
[L. akin to G. sialon]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
In the present study, we found that the glucose levels in parotid saliva glucose were higher than in mixed saliva in both diabetes patients and controls.
Parotid saliva is easy to collect by both unstimulated and stimulated conditions (by chewing or acids).
That maybethe reason forthe increased glucose concentration in parotid saliva of type 2DM patients.
Effect of angiotensin II on parotid saliva secretion in conscious sheep.
Effect of parotid saliva secretion on dry forage intake in goats.
Lysozyme determination in parotid saliva from patients with Sjogren syndrome.
In the RIAPS-NB control, a balloon was not intraruminally inserted and at the start of feeding, 3.5 L of artificial parotid saliva was intraruminally infused using a bath tub pump.
The hypertonic solution was made by adding NaCl into the artificial parotid saliva. The hypertonic solution had an osmolality of 1,240.8 [+ or -] 124.69 mOsmol/L, pH 8.4 [+ or -] 0.09, and its concentrations of [Na.sup.+], [K.sup.+], [Cl.sup.-], H[[CO.sub.3].sup.-], and HP[[O.sub.4].sup.-] were 672.3 [+ or -] 55.62 mmol/L, 2.8 [+ or -] 0.11 mmol/L, 489.4 [+ or -] 15.05 mmol/L, 36.3 [+ or -] 0.00 mmol/L, and 10 [+ or -] 0.00 mmol/L, respectively.
2B, whereas 6570 transcripts were detected in the whole saliva, the assay detected 4778, 1831,1543,2689, and 3142 transcripts in the parotid saliva, sublingual saliva, submandibular saliva, GCF, and oral epithelial cells, respectively.
In the first experimental stage, group A was the control and received the intraruminal infusion of artificial parotid saliva (RIAPS) while group B as the treatment was subjected to the intraruminal infusion of hypertonic solution (RIHS).
In the RIAPS control, 3.48 [+ or -] 0.06 L of artificial parotid saliva, a solution resembling parotid saliva (Sunagawa et al., 2008), was intraruminally infused to replenish saliva removed from the esophageal fistula during sham feeding.
In parotid fistulated sheep, parotid saliva is lost from the body causing a reduction in plasma Na concentration and circulating plasma volume.