parotid

(redirected from parotid region)
Also found in: Dictionary.

parotid

 [pah-rot´id]
near the ear.
parotid glands the largest of the three main pairs of salivary glands, located on either side of the face, just below and in front of the ears. From each gland a duct, the parotid duct (sometimes called Stensen's duct), runs forward across the cheek and opens on the inside surface of the cheek opposite the second molar of the upper jaw.

The parotid glands are made up of groups of cells clustered around a globular cavity, resembling a bunch of grapes. Small ducts draining each cavity join the ducts of neighboring cavities to form large ducts, which in turn join the parotid duct.

From the system of ducts flows the thin, watery secretion of the parotid glands called saliva, which plays an important role in the process of digestion. As food is chewed the saliva with which it is mixed and moistened makes it possible for the food to be reduced to a substance that can be swallowed.

Controlled by the autonomic nervous system, the secretion of the salivary glands begins whenever the sensory nerves of the mouth, or in some cases nerves located elsewhere in the body, are stimulated.

Salivation may be an involuntary reflex, as when food or even inedible material placed in the mouth starts the flow of the secretion from the glands, or it may be a conditioned reflex, as when the flow is started by the sight, smell, or thought of food.
Disorders of the Parotid Glands. The most common disease affecting the parotid glands is mumps, or epidemic parotitis.

Swelling and tenderness may also result from infections caused by other viruses or bacteria in the glands. Less often, these symptoms indicate a blockage of a duct by either infection or a calculus, in which case the swelling is likely to fluctuate, especially at mealtimes. Though stubborn or recurring cases sometimes require surgery, stones often can be removed by massage. For infections, antibiotics and warm compresses are the usual treatment.

Occasionally additional glandular masses grow in or near a parotid gland. The majority of such growths are mixed tumors, so called because they contain cartilage or other material as well as the usual glandular material. Usually they are benign; occasionally they may be malignant and require surgery.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

pa·rot·id

(pă-rot'id),
Situated near the ear; denoting several structures in this neighborhood. Usually refers to the parotid salivary gland.
[G. parōtis (parōtid-), the gland beside the ear, fr. para, beside, + ous (ōt-), ear]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

parotid

(pə-rŏt′ĭd)
n.
A parotid gland.
adj.
1. Situated near the ear: the parotid region of the face.
2. Of or relating to a parotid gland.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

parotid

adjective Referring to the parotid (gland).
 
noun  Parotid gland; glandula parotidea [NA6].
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

pa·rot·id

(pă-rot'id)
Situated near the ear; denoting several structures in this neighborhood. Usually refers to the parotid salivary gland.
[G. parōtis (parōtid-), the gland beside the ear, fr. para, beside, + ous (ōt-), ear]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

pa·rot·id

(pă-rot'id)
Situated near the ear; denoting several structures in this area.
[G. parōtis (parōtid-), the gland beside the ear, fr. para, beside, + ous (ōt-), ear]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
In 2015, De liz et al reported a case of 37 years old female who underwent surgery followed by radiation therapy and remained free of disease after 5 years of follow up.20 Hedge et al reported a case of 42 years old lady with DFSP of parotid region who developed recurrence after 9 months of surgical excision.
The facial nerve in the parotid region of the rats was preferred because it is easy to reach and has the same characteristics as the facial nerve in the middle ear.
As with any mass in the parotid region, results of imaging investigations (USG, CT and MRI) and FNA cytology must be analyzed in context to arrive at the correct diagnosis [3].
For some authors, the SMAS does not exist as an autonomous entity and may only be defined in the parotid region [17,18].
This resulted in subsequent acute on chronic infection, the formation of a local inflammatory mass, which extended into the parotid region and the subsequent clinical features.
The left prosthesis was replaced in 2008 soon after he developed swelling and pain in the left parotid region. Examination of the joint showed no abnormalities.
Examination of the soft tissues of the face was based on inspection, palpation of the parotid region. To evaluate intra-oral tissues was used wooden spatula.
A case of bilateral multiple intra-parenchymal parotid calculi in and otherwise healthy patient who developed recurrent parotid swelling and had unusual cutaneous exfoliation of parotid calculi from the parotid region, is reported.
A physical exam reveals an approximately 5 X 3-cm, firm, nontender, mobile mass in the left parotid region. Facial nerve function is intact.
Physical examination revealed a 4 x 3-cm soft fullness over the left cheek and parotid region, most consistent with a fatty or cystic lesion.
The histologic features of diffuse neurofibroma involving the parotid region are similar to those seen in diffuse neurofibromas of the skin or other sites.
Type I lesions present in the parotid region and are ectodermal in origin, and they appear clinically as soft cysts lined by squamous epithelium.