PUN

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PUN

Abbreviation for:
plasma urea nitrogen
patient unmet needs
References in periodicals archive ?
For the purposes of our study we will have to unify first the scientific language of linguists and bring it to the meaning of eponymy and paronomasia from the area of classical rhetoric in order to use the semantic and semasiology research in literature.
quae cum multa sint, ex omnibus necessaria fere sunt decem et septem, quorum haec sunt nomina: prolepsis, zeugma, hypozeuxis, syllepsis, anadiplosis, anaphora, epanalepsis, epizeuxis, paronomasia, schesis onomaton, parhomoeon, homoeoptoton.
takes as a starting point the Cratylus of Plato, in which Stoic thinking is targeted, epitomized in part in the Pseudo-Augustine de Dialectica (or Principia Dialecticae), which offers four rules, as it were, of paronomasia (simplified here): similitudo, echoing, change of emphasis of transference, and the use of opposites.
Most often, as in the progression from "coeurs empennes" to "coeurs en peine," it involves paronomasia.
The rhetorics of Shakespeare's time distinguished a number of different kinds of phonetic, semantic, and syntactic overlapping, for example, paronomasia, antanaclasis, asteismus, and syllepsis.
Whether Banquo as a "banquet" is a true diaphora here, the repetition certainly offers a good paronomasia approximating that figure.
It is not far-fetched to read iacet in the Medea passage as an instance of paronomasia with Vergil's iactetur.
Sustained neologistic paronomasia is one of Lem's fundamental ways of investigating the unknown and estranging the familiar, especially when his own fiction is the subject of such investigation and estrangement.
He has no entries for episode (much in use in discussing ancient drama, but also in Beowulf criticism -- episodic is in Baldick's book), maker (or, better, Scottish makar), marginalia, narratage, pamphlet and pamphleteer, rapportage, saint's life or vita, and word-play (there are entries for paronomasia and pun).
The related rhetorical figure is adnominatio: the replacement of one thing by something externally similar but essentially different, which reverses the effect of the first, as in mundi culpam mundasti; paronomasia.
Guo takes particular care to point out allusions, instances of paronomasia, double entendre, and other figures of speech, not only in the chapter "The Ornament of the Poetry" (pp.