parity


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parity

 [par´ĭ-te]
1. para; the condition of a woman with respect to her having borne viable offspring.
2. equality; close correspondence or similarity.

par·i·ty

(par'ĭ-tē),
1. The condition of having given birth to an infant or infants, alive or dead.
2. Concept that mental health care costs should be reimbursed by third-party payers at the same percentage, i.e., "on parity with" somatic health care costs.
[L. pario, to bear]

parity

/par·i·ty/ (par´ĭ-te)
1. para; the condition of a woman with respect to having borne viable offspring.
2. equality; close correspondence or similarity.

parity

(păr′ĭ-tē)
n.
1. The condition of having given birth.
2. The number of children borne by one woman.

parity

[per′itē]
Etymology: L, parere, to give birth
1 (in obstetrics) the classification of a woman by the number of live-born children and stillbirths she has delivered at more than 20 weeks of gestation. Commonly parity is noted with the total number of pregnancies and represented by the letter P or the word para. A para 4 (P4) gravida 5 (G5) has had four deliveries after 20 weeks and one abortion or miscarriage before 20 weeks. Currently a more complete system is in use: the total number of term infants (T) is followed by the number of premature infants (P), the number of abortions or miscarriages before 20 weeks' gestation (A), and the number of children living at present (L). This system may be abbreviated as TPAL.
2 (in epidemiology) the classification of a woman by the number of live-born children she has delivered.
3 (in computer processing) the condition of a set of items, either even or odd in number, used as a means for checking errors, such as in the transmission of information between various elements of the same computer.

par·i·ty

(par'i-tē)
The condition of having given birth to an infant or infants, alive or dead; a multiple birth is considered as a single parous experience.
[L. pario, to bear]

par·i·ty

(par'i-tē)
The condition of having given birth to an infant or infants, alive or dead; a multiple birth is considered as a single parous experience.
[L. pario, to bear]

parity (par´itē),

n the use of a set of items, either even or odd in number, as a means for checking computer errors, such as in the transmission of information between various elements of the same computer.

parity

1. para; the condition of a breeding female with respect to her having borne viable offspring.
2. equality; close correspondence or similarity.

Patient discussion about parity

Q. PROPORCIONAN SEGURO MEDICO PARA PACIENTES DO YOU OFFER MEDICAL INSURANCE TO PATIENTS?

A. This website does not offer medical insurance.

More discussions about parity
References in periodicals archive ?
The moderating effect parity perceptions were tested by subgroup analysis (cf.
The 1996 Mental Health Parity Act was designed to remain in effect for only six years.
Thus, heterosis of the sow increased number of piglets and litter weight at weaning in the first parity and the sums of number of piglets born alive and weaned from the second to the last parity.
The parity task force is inviting members of the public to send comments about parity enforcement to parity@hhs.
Today's decision gives professional organizations, such as the APA and the NYSPA, the right, on behalf of its members and their patients, to sue for mental health parity violations, which is important because patients are often unable to speak for themselves," APA President Renee Binder said in a statement.
The researchers cautioned that it was impossible to establish causality between SUD parity laws and patients' access to treatment.
Sponsors' burgeoning interest in risk parity "goes back to what's at the heart of target-date funds, which is diversification and finding a better way of diversifying," Nikles says.
Finally, it is important to consider the ways in which the MHPAEA defines parity to understand how it may affect utilization and expenditures.
It is still rare to see investors allocating 100% to a risk parity framework, although this should change as pooled multi-asset risk parity strategies become more available to those looking for a diversified growth fund-style option within DC default strategies," Teiletche says.
19) In addition to California's Knox-Keene Act, Congress signed into federal law the United States' Mental Health Parity Act on September 26, 1997.
Parity progression driven by a desire for sons has several demographic and health ramifications.