parity


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parity

 [par´ĭ-te]
1. para; the condition of a woman with respect to her having borne viable offspring.
2. equality; close correspondence or similarity.

par·i·ty

(par'ĭ-tē),
1. The condition of having given birth to an infant or infants, alive or dead.
2. Concept that mental health care costs should be reimbursed by third-party payers at the same percentage, i.e., "on parity with" somatic health care costs.
[L. pario, to bear]

parity

/par·i·ty/ (par´ĭ-te)
1. para; the condition of a woman with respect to having borne viable offspring.
2. equality; close correspondence or similarity.

parity

(păr′ĭ-tē)
n.
1. The condition of having given birth.
2. The number of children borne by one woman.

parity

[per′itē]
Etymology: L, parere, to give birth
1 (in obstetrics) the classification of a woman by the number of live-born children and stillbirths she has delivered at more than 20 weeks of gestation. Commonly parity is noted with the total number of pregnancies and represented by the letter P or the word para. A para 4 (P4) gravida 5 (G5) has had four deliveries after 20 weeks and one abortion or miscarriage before 20 weeks. Currently a more complete system is in use: the total number of term infants (T) is followed by the number of premature infants (P), the number of abortions or miscarriages before 20 weeks' gestation (A), and the number of children living at present (L). This system may be abbreviated as TPAL.
2 (in epidemiology) the classification of a woman by the number of live-born children she has delivered.
3 (in computer processing) the condition of a set of items, either even or odd in number, used as a means for checking errors, such as in the transmission of information between various elements of the same computer.

par·i·ty

(par'i-tē)
The condition of having given birth to an infant or infants, alive or dead; a multiple birth is considered as a single parous experience.
[L. pario, to bear]

par·i·ty

(par'i-tē)
The condition of having given birth to an infant or infants, alive or dead; a multiple birth is considered as a single parous experience.
[L. pario, to bear]

parity (par´itē),

n the use of a set of items, either even or odd in number, as a means for checking computer errors, such as in the transmission of information between various elements of the same computer.

parity

1. para; the condition of a breeding female with respect to her having borne viable offspring.
2. equality; close correspondence or similarity.

Patient discussion about parity

Q. PROPORCIONAN SEGURO MEDICO PARA PACIENTES DO YOU OFFER MEDICAL INSURANCE TO PATIENTS?

A. This website does not offer medical insurance.

More discussions about parity
References in periodicals archive ?
Through the fall of 2015, ParityTrack will work with partners such as Treatment Research Institute, Parity Implementation Coalition, Legal Action Center, Community Catalyst, and Health Law Advocates to continue to analyze parity-related actions, and develop additional tailored resources for consumers and other audiences.
Bendat said remedies for mental health parity law violations that might occur in the administration of plans purchased through exchanges created by the Affordable Care Act have yet to be tested, although he thought the recent ruling might strengthen any legal theories plaintiffs in those situations might employ.
We're not saying that these reports are actual violations of the parity law, but that they are documented issues that patients and treatment centers are facing.
If fa parity or parity-if-offered were legislated, the treatment rates in all facilities climbed by 13% (P = .
Finally, it is important to consider the ways in which the MHPAEA defines parity to understand how it may affect utilization and expenditures.
Not much attention has been paid to systematic statistical analysis of the relationship between the sex composition of a family's living children and realized fertility, as measured by probability of parity progression.
Last year the Senate adopted Landrieu's amendment to the 2010 Defense Authorization Act, writing the parity rule into law, but the amendment was dropped in a House-Senate conference committee.
Health insurance plans may be granted a one-year exemption from the parity requirements if they experience total increased costs of two percent in the first year after implementation and one percent in subsequent years.
Instead, the dollar could return to purchasing power parity if prices in the United States rise faster than prices abroad.
The government will study and report on patterns of coverage under parity, to ensure that the bill is having its intended effect.
is encouraging to see that Parity can now attract such high calibre individuals
Matthews' efforts to achieve funding parity for every grade in Ontario's Catholic schools.