parietal

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parietal

 [pah-ri´ĕ-t'l]
1. of or pertaining to the walls of an organ or cavity.
2. pertaining to or located near the parietal bone. See anatomic Table of Bones in the Appendices.

pa·ri·e·tal

(pă-rī'ĕ-tăl),
1. Relating to the wall of any cavity.
2. Synonym(s): somatic (1)
3. Synonym(s): somatic (2)
4. Relating to the parietal bone.

parietal

(pə-rī′ĭ-təl)
adj.
1. Relating to or forming the wall of a body part, organ, or cavity.
2. Of or relating to either of the parietal bones.
3. Botany Borne on the inside of the ovary wall. Used of the ovules or placentas in flowering plants.
n.
A parietal part, such as a wall or bone.

parietal

adjective Referring to the wall of an organ or cavity.

pa·ri·e·tal

(pă-rī'ĕ-tăl)
1. Relating to the wall of any cavity.
2. Synonym(s): somatic (1) .
3. Synonym(s): somatic (2) .
4. Relating to the parietal bone.

parietal

Pertaining to the wall or outer surface of a part of the body. From Latin parietem , a wall or partition.

parietal

  1. (of plant organs) joined to a wall, as in parietal ovules attached to the wall of the ovary.
  2. 2 of or relating to the bones of the top of the skull, which have a membranous structure and lie behind the frontal bones.
  3. 3 (of coelomic lining) covering the body wall as distinct from visceral organs (See also OXYNTIC CELL).
References in periodicals archive ?
(6) Finally, a slightly depressed transverse sulcus crossed the upper part of the right parietal bone, parallel to the coronal suture, measuring about 5 mm (Figure 7).
The proliferative lesions at the occipital and parietal bones could be a physiologic response to cranial deformation, but porotic hyperostosis, subperiosteal hemorrhage, scurvy and rickets should also be considered (Ortner et al.
The same continued compression had an indirect effect on the skull bones, forcing the free parts to bend, especially the parietal and upper occipital bones.
We have also to consider that from birth to the ninth month of age, the baby's parietal bones normally have the most active growth period and the more accentuated bending, producing even a bilobal appearance in adults.
Under such a special condition, and depending on the kind of deforming apparatus used, the parietal and occipital bones could suffer an extra stimulus for periosteal deposition at the bending areas, producing this peculiar pattern of periosteal proliferation.
A very similar parietal pattern can be seen in children suffering from rickets (Ortner and Putschar 1997).